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An argument in favor of existence of big foot yeti and sasquatch

Did Bigfoot Really Exist? Whatever you want to call it, such a giant, mythical ape is not real—at least, not anymore.

But more than a million years ago, an ape as big as a polar bear lived in South Asia, until going extinct 300,000 years ago. Scientists first learned of Gigantopithecus in 1935, when Ralph von Koenigswald, a German paleoanthropologist, walked into a pharmacy in Hong Kong and found an unusually large primate molar for sale.

Since then, researchers have collected hundreds of Gigantopithecus teeth and several jaws in China, Vietnam and India.

Based on these fossils, it appears Gigantopithecus was closely related to modern orangutans and Sivapithecusan ape that lived in Asia about 12 to 8 million years ago. But based on comparisons with gorillas and other modern apes, researchers estimate Gigantopithecus stood more than 10 feet tall and weighed 1,200 pounds at most, gorillas only weigh 400 pounds.

Given their size, they probably lived on the ground, walking on their fists like modern orangutans.

  • The hairs purported to come from Bigfoot or the Abominable Snowman or other regional varieties of the creature belonged not to a previously unknown primate, but to known mammals;
  • Several years later, in his 1935 book The Design of Experiments, Fisher described how to test such a claim;
  • It Is Also a Creation Story.

And the teeth of Gigantopithecus also provide clues to why the ape disappeared. The features of the dentition—large, flat molars, thick dental enamel, a deep, massive jaw—indicate Gigantopithecus probably ate tough, fibrous plants similar to Paranthropus.

Why We Can’t Rule Out Bigfoot

Based on the types of phyoliths the researchers found stuck to the teeth, they concluded Gigantopithecus had a mixed diet of fruits and seeds from the fig family Moraceae and some kind of grasses, probably bamboo. The same thing could have happened to Gigantopithecus. Zhao LingXia of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and colleagues analyzed carbon isotopes in a sample of Gigantopithecus teeth. Plants have different forms of carbon based on their type of photosynthesis; this carbon footprint is then recorded in the teeth of animals that eat plants.

The team determined Gigantopithecus—and the animals living alongside it, such as deer, horses and bears—ate only C3 plants, evidence the ape lived in a forested environment. This work also supports the proposed bamboo diet, as bamboo is a C3 plant.

  1. Since then, researchers have collected hundreds of Gigantopithecus teeth and several jaws in China, Vietnam and India.
  2. The scientists found precise matches for all 30 samples in previously known mammals. Which brings us back to Bigfoot.
  3. Bigfoot advocates have repeatedly claimed that professional scientists are willfully ignoring compelling evidence. My correspondent summed up his opinion succinctly.
  4. People often think that the job of scientists is to prove a hypothesis is true—the existence of electrons, for example, or the ability of a drug to cure cancer. He would scramble the cups into a random order and offer them to Bristol to sip, one at a time.

So what happened to this Pleistocene Yeti? Other factors could have exacerbated this crisis. Some Bigfoot hunters say Gigantopithecus is alive and well, hiding out in the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

  • With a 50 percent chance of being right, she might easily answer correctly by chance alone;
  • Some Bigfoot hunters say Gigantopithecus is alive and well, hiding out in the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

Other Sasquatch enthusiastshowever, point out this is unlikely, as Bigfoot is reported to be a swift, agile, upright walker—not a lumbering, 1,200-pound quadruped. As in biological anthropology and science writing.

  1. Does this mean Sykes and his colleagues have proved that Bigfoot does not exist?
  2. They extracted DNA fragments from 30 different hair samples and were able to isolate the same short stretch of DNA from each.
  3. Which brings us back to Bigfoot.
  4. They then compared that stretch to the corresponding stretch of DNA sequenced from many living mammals. He would prepare eight cups, putting milk first into four of them, and milk second into the other four.
  5. Plants have different forms of carbon based on their type of photosynthesis; this carbon footprint is then recorded in the teeth of animals that eat plants.