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An argument in favor of gun ownership in the united states

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A point of pride for some and a source of fear for others, guns continue to ignite sharp debates in our society. While gun owners and non-owners have significant differences in views about gun policy, they agree in some areas. For example, large majorities of both groups favor restricting access to guns for individuals with mental illnesses and those who are on federal no-fly or watch lists. Gun owners themselves have diverse views on gun policy, driven in large part by party identification.

Here are some key takeaways from the reportwhich is based on a new nationally representative survey of 3,930 U.

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Gun ownership cuts across demographic groups but is more concentrated among some. White adults are more likely than blacks or Hispanics to own guns, and white men are particularly likely to be gun owners: Americans with less education also are more likely to be gun owners, a gap that is widest among whites.

  • But regardless of where one falls, the fact remains that U;
  • Gun owners themselves have diverse views on gun policy, driven in large part by party identification;
  • And regardless of whether they own a gun or not, people are more likely to say that keeping guns locked away and unloaded and storing guns and ammunition separately are essential steps to take if the gun owner has children in the home;
  • But owners who live in rural areas are significantly more likely to cite hunting as a major reason for owning a gun;
  • When it comes to safety measures such as keeping guns locked away and unloaded, storing guns and ammunition separately, taking gun safety courses, and keeping shooting skills up to date, non-gun owners are consistently more likely than gun owners to say each is essential;
  • Bill of Rights and the Second Amendment to the U.

There is a vast urban-rural divide in gun ownership rates. In addition, gun ownership is strongly linked to party affiliation: Smaller shares cite a gun collection or their job as major reasons. Majorities of gun owners who live in cities, suburbs and rural areas say protection is a major reason they own firearms.

But owners who live in rural areas are significantly more likely to cite hunting as a major reason for owning a gun. Among those who own just one gun, handguns are by far the most popular: When it comes to safety measures such as keeping guns locked away and unloaded, storing guns and ammunition separately, taking gun safety courses, and keeping shooting skills up to date, non-gun owners are consistently more likely than gun owners to say each is essential.

  1. White adults are more likely than blacks or Hispanics to own guns, and white men are particularly likely to be gun owners.
  2. And while similarly high shares of gun owners and non-owners cite illegal access to guns as a major contributor to gun violence, opinions diverge when it comes to guns that are obtained legally. That argument appears to gather momentum with every report of a mass shooting.
  3. But regardless of where one falls, the fact remains that U. While gun owners and non-owners have significant differences in views about gun policy, they agree in some areas.

And regardless of whether they own a gun or not, people are more likely to say that keeping guns locked away and unloaded and storing guns and ammunition separately are essential steps to take if the gun owner has children in the home.

While gun owners and non-owners tend to agree on most top-tier constitutional rights, one key difference is the extent to which owners associate the right to own guns with their own personal sense of freedom.

Key takeaways on Americans’ views of guns and gun ownership

Partisanship is strongly correlated with views about the importance of gun ownership as a guaranteed right. Owners and non-owners are sharply divided when it comes to creating a federal database to track gun sales, banning assault-style weapons, and banning high-capacity magazines.

However, while support for these proposals is much higher among non-gun owners, significant shares of owners are open to these proposals. There also are areas of agreement. Solid majorities of both gun owners and non-owners favor limiting access to guns for people with mental illnesses and individuals who are on federal no-fly or terrorist watch lists, and strong majorities favor background checks for private sales and at gun shows.

There is also a partisan divide on views of gun policy, and these differences remain even after controlling for gun ownership.

Americans and Guns: A Look at Ownership Rights, Laws, Arguments and Numbers

For example, Republican gun owners are much more resistant than Democratic owners to banning assault-style weapons and high-capacity magazines as well as creating a database to track gun sales.

And Republicans are much more open than Democrats to proposals that would expand gun rights, such as allowing people to carry concealed guns in more places and allowing teachers and officials to carry guns in K-12 schools.

Overall, half of Americans say gun violence is a very big problem in the United States, but perceptions of gun violence vary considerably by gun ownership. Americans see many factors as playing a role in gun violence.

And while similarly high shares of gun owners and non-owners cite illegal access to guns as a major contributor to gun violence, opinions diverge when it comes to guns that are obtained legally. Again, blacks are more likely than whites to say they have had this experience: Gun owners are no more likely to have experienced this than non-gun owners.