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An introduction to the history of cuban missile crisis

Leaves active nuclear missiles very close to the US. Attack Would destroy most missile sites. Would make it difficult for the USSR to send military equipment like missiles and other supplies. The missile sites that were already in Cuba would still be there. A blockade is also an act of war and could start a real war against the USSR.

Cold War: A Brief History

On October 20, Kennedy chose to blockade Cuba to stop all ships going there, rather than listen to his advisers, who wanted to attack. Nikita Khrushchev sent a letter to Kennedy on October 26. Kennedy's advisers said that the letter looked like it had been written by Khrushchev himself and not his official writers, who would normally write it.

  • Khrushchev put Warsaw Pact forces on alert;
  • Kennedy decided to send a secret message to Khrushchev saying that they would remove the missiles from Turkey in a few months as long as they did not tell the public about it;
  • These missiles would have been capable of quickly reaching the United States;
  • Jupiter missiles were removed from Turkey in April 1963;
  • Let us not only relax the forces pulling on the end of the rope; let us take means to untie the knot;
  • The missile sites in Turkey were removed, but not in the way that Khrushchev had wanted.

They also said that it seemed to be written by a man who was under stress. War is our enemy and a calamity for all people. If indeed war should break out, then it would not be in our power to stop it, for such is the logic of war. I have participated in two wars and I know that war ends only when it has rolled through cities and villages, everywhere sowing death and destruction.

I should like you to agree that one cannot give way to pressures; it is necessary to control them. If people do not show wisdom, then in the final analysis they will come to a clash, like blind moles, and then reciprocal extermination will begin.

If you have not lost your self-control, then Mr. President we and you ought not now to pull on the end of a rope in which you have tied the knot of war, because the more the two of us pull, the tighter the knot will be tied.

  • Although the events at sea offered a positive sign that war could be averted, they did nothing to address the problem of the missiles already in Cuba;
  • Kennedy decided to send a secret message to Khrushchev saying that they would remove the missiles from Turkey in a few months as long as they did not tell the public about it;
  • I should like you to agree that one cannot give way to pressures; it is necessary to control them;
  • Some advisers—including all the Joint Chiefs of Staff—argued for an air strike to destroy the missiles, followed by a U.

And a moment may come when that knot will be tied so tight that even he who tied it will not have the strength to untie it. And then it will be necessary to cut that knot. And what that will mean is not for me to explain to you, because you yourself understand perfectly what terrible forces our countries possess. Let us not only relax the forces pulling on the end of the rope; let us take means to untie the knot.

We are ready for this. An invasion of Cuba would make Khrushchev look bad and could also lead to a nuclear war. This was the reaction that Kennedy wanted.

  • Soon after this incident, the famous "hotline" was installed between the U;
  • The missile sites that were already in Cuba would still be there;
  • ABC News correspondent John Scali reported to the White House that he had been approached by a Soviet agent suggesting that an agreement could be reached in which the Soviets would remove their missiles from Cuba if the United States promised not to invade the island;
  • Kennedy decided to send a secret message to Khrushchev saying that they would remove the missiles from Turkey in a few months as long as they did not tell the public about it.

The very next day, a second letter was sent from Russia to Kennedy. This one looked more official than the first. It also said that the US must take its nuclear missiles out of Turkey if they wanted Russia to take their missiles out of Cuba. This would have been a fair trade because the US missiles in Turkey were close enough to Russia that they could reach most of the important cities and Cuba was close enough to the US that the Russian missiles would reach most of the important US cities.

The problem for Kennedy was that he could not publicly agree to remove the US missiles from Turkey because Turkey would then not be protected and would not be happy. Another problem was that Kennedy and his advisers did not know if Khrushchev was still in power. They thought that someone in the Russian government might have overthrown Khrushchev. They thought this because the second letter was so much different than the first. Kennedy decided to send a secret message to Khrushchev saying that they would remove the missiles from Turkey in a few months as long as they did not tell the public about it.

Kennedy then sent an official letter to Khrushchev agreeing to the conditions of the first letter and not mentioning the second. Khrushchev agreed to the secret message.

Cuban Missile Crisis

On November 1, the missile sites were removed, and the problems were over. Khrushchev's goals in the crisis had various results: A communist country was closer to the United States.

Cuba came out of the crisis still a communist country. Kennedy was pushed in the crisis. In the end, his desire for peace was important to ending the crisis.

The Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1962

The missile sites in Turkey were removed, but not in the way that Khrushchev had wanted. The United States saw Kennedy as the hero who had fought Communism and won. Kennedy During the Cuban Missile Crisis: A Comparison of Public and Private Rhetoric".

Political Psychology 21 3: