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Deaf in america voices from a culture

April 6, 2016 at 2: I had never really considered being Deaf as something that came with a heritage. Despite knowing about the history of Deaf Americans. It is cool to think about how the Deaf have their own heritage like the Swedish, Japanese, or German do. The Epee folktale was simple, very sweet, and very romanticized.

As I read it I hoped the book would share more examples of Deaf folklore which they did.

Deaf in America : voices from a culture

As I read about how important the folktale seemed to be to the Deaf people the authors met with in France, I too was wondering why they did not hear stories about Laurent Clerc.

But as I read on I realized the story served as a more symbolic tale. The book talked about the character moving, "from the darkness of the night into the light and warmth of the house" 29.

Deaf in America

This sentence was really moving to me, and made me hope that Deaf people can continue to move out of the darkness of oppression and social isolation into the light of a world with educated individuals who can learn to accept others, regardless of differences. As I read the segments about Deaf schools in France I became curious about how many residential Schools for the Deaf are actually in France. Strikingly, Italy has sixteen. To make this shocking fact more apparent-Italy is about the size of California, and France is about the size of Montana and Wyoming put together.

Italy has a significantly larger number of Deaf schools compared to France. This makes me wonder about the history of the Italian Deaf and why they have such a large number of Schools for the Deaf compared to surrounding nations. Later in the chapter the authors wrote, ".

[PDF] Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture Full Collection

I thought this sentence was beautiful. We are all trying to find each other in life: The book moves on to discuss how the dark street in the story represents the experience of Deaf children before they meet other Deaf individuals.

Deaf in America : Voices from a Culture by Carol Padden and Tom Humphries (1990, Paperback)

This made me hope that perhaps Hearing signers could help brighten that world just a little. The story of Joshua Davis gave me similar hope.

  • So far it is really interesting;
  • Carol Padden and Tom Humphries employ the capitalized "Deaf" to refer to deaf people who share a natural language—American Sign Language ASL—and a complex culture, historically created and actively transmitted across generations;
  • We are all trying to find each other in life:

The soldier who had a Deaf brother and stood up for the accused boy reminds me of when Hearing signers are able to step in and help a Deaf individual be accepted into a Hearing community, or interpret for them in a sticky situation.

Reading in this chapter about all of the teachers at Deaf schools who do not want their students using sign continues to make me angry.

  • The authors introduce new material that has never before been published and also offer translations that capture as closely as possible the richness of the original material in ASL;
  • Why become a teacher of the Deaf if you do not enjoy signing;
  • The soldier who had a Deaf brother and stood up for the accused boy reminds me of when Hearing signers are able to step in and help a Deaf individual be accepted into a Hearing community, or interpret for them in a sticky situation.

Those people signed up for a job working with signers, did they expect to just assimilate everyone to their language? Why become a teacher of the Deaf if you do not enjoy signing.

  • April 6, 2016 at 2;
  • I think this is a very interesting way to look at it;
  • The author then goes on to recall a story that is a response to the image of a Deaf person that is "ideal" from the hearing perspective, yet is very unrealistic;
  • Despite knowing about the history of Deaf Americans;
  • Table of Contents Written by authors who are themselves Deaf, this unique book illuminates the life and culture of Deaf people from the inside, through their everyday talk, their shared myths, their art and performances, and the lessons they teach one another;
  • I think this is a very interesting way to look at it.

In my opinion, it is completely inappropriate to try to assimilate someone else's culture into yours. Lastly, the most profound part of this chapter for me was the section in which they depict the dunking and caning of Deaf children who use sign when oral methods are being forced on them.

Sticking someone's head in a bowl of water until they nearly drown is against every fiber of morality. I am glad these methods are now outlawed. I can only imagine the terror children in those schools experienced on the daily.