Essays academic service


Identity and the aspects that shape it

Events That Shape Identity Which events have had the greatest impact on your personal identity and the identity of your school and community? Suggested Activities Students explore the influences on identity by rating the events with the greatest impact on their personal identity and the identity of their school and community. Students explore events that shape personal and school identity before proceeding to events that impact community identity.

If students are sufficiently familiar with the concept of identity, move directly to factors that shape community identity.

Events That Shape Identity

To review the idea of personal identity, see the activities in What Makes You, You? Review personal identity Ask students to imagine one of these events: Next, ask students to describe the changes—both positive and negative—to their feelings about themselves if the event happened.

  • Thereby, non-collaborative and non-productive;
  • When people think of our school, they;;;
  • Here are some of the ways that I characterize myself;
  • Three words that best describe our school are;;;
  • This can be a fine line to walk; I think of it as the difference between being principled and self-righteous.

For example, if their hockey team won a major tournament, there might be these positive effects: Consider the impact of five changes on personal identity Invite students to think of several memorable or significant events in their own lives.

Ask them to write a before-and-after reflection to explore the impact each event had on their personal identities; e. To organize their thinking, students may wish to use a T-chart or sentence stems; e. Because of the sensitive nature of the topic, it is important that students experience a safe and encouraging environment within which to share their personal feelings and histories.

Rate the impact of events on personal identity Ask students to consider the degree to which each event impacted their lives and their personal identity. With the class, explore criteria for the greatest personal impact, such as: You may want to use the Rating Impact chart found in Rating Options Support Material to structure and assess this activity. After students have completed their ratings, organize them into groups to share the impact of their significant events.

Explore school identity Invite students to think about their school's identity—what makes it unique, distinctive or reflects its collective spirit. If necessary, provide students with sentence stems, such as the following: We're a school that prides itself on. Our school is known for. When people think of our school, they.

  1. Not all of you will agree with the principles I follow, but understanding them will certainly help us have a productive dialogue.
  2. Steve was inflexible on things like design and user experience, but he chose those things thoughtfully and with a purpose.
  3. Who you stand with. I believe in a number of key principles that I apply to myself and the world at large.

When students talk about our school, they. Three words that best describe our school are. Explore how events impact school identity Ask students to consider how these events might affect a school's identity: Remind students that events may have positive or negative impacts on school identity; e.

Rate the impact of events on school identity Direct students, individually, to identify a significant school event and ask them to complete a before-and-after reflection. Develop criteria for determining the greatest impact on school's identity: Ask students to rate the impact of the events.

Invite students to share their events and ratings with each other or with the class. Introduction to community identity Ask students to think about their community's identity—what makes it unique, distinct or contributes to its collective spirit.

If necessary, provide students with sentence stems that parallel those suggested above for recognizing the school's identity. Examine community changes Invite students to consider how their community has changed in recent years; e.

  • If you thought the invasion of Iraq was a mistake, what did you personally do about it?
  • Our actions shape our identity, and in turn, our identity shapes our actions;
  • Invite students to identify which events are primarily political events and which are primarily economic events.

Brainstorm and record these changes on a chart. Post the chart for later use. Discuss how the community was before the changes and how it is after the changes. If necessary, point out that events affect the community in positive and negative ways. You may wish to share current or past news events, headlines, articles or photographs to illustrate significant economic and political changes.

Political and economic events Explain to students that many community events can be classified as economic or political events: Invite students to identify which events are primarily political events and which are primarily economic events. Analyze impact of community events Brainstorm the impact of the community events. Ask students to record their responses on a T-chart. In the left column, identity and the aspects that shape it the community change, and in the right column, use point form to indicate how each event shaped the community's identity.

Consider using visual mapping tools, if available, to record the brainstorming. Rate impact of events on community identity After students have identified the impact of each event, invite them, in groups, to rate the impact on their community's current identity.

With the class, review the criteria for judging impact on school's identity, and ask students to use similar criteria for judging impact on community's identity.

What are the various factors that shape identity? Essay

You may want to adapt the Rating Impact chart found in Rating Options Support Material to structure and assess this activity. Reach consensus on the most significant event Invite groups to share their ratings. As a class, try to reach consensus on the most significant political and economic events.

Discuss how these events contribute to the community's identity. July 1, 2014 Revision History.

  1. Thereby, non-collaborative and non-productive.
  2. To organize their thinking, students may wish to use a T-chart or sentence stems; e.
  3. Choose your own identity Identity comes from choice; choice comes from identity. Post the chart for later use.
  4. Students explore events that shape personal and school identity before proceeding to events that impact community identity.
  5. We are all moral agents, and we need to be thoughtful about what we stand for.