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The economical and political aspects of cuba

By Les Neuhaus Nov 27, 2016 4: Among young people, there seemed to be a sense of hope that Castro's passing would signal a more open era, with enhanced individual freedom and opportunities for employment.

  • Last year, a pair of candidates tried to become the first non-Communist politicians to win municipal posts, mounting a modest campaign;
  • The lesson to would-be reformers was clear;
  • The government in Cuba is controlled by a Communist Party council that serves as a legislative body and is consulted a few times a year for new laws.

Advertisement "I wish there were more liberties, that we could leave Cuba easier, visit other countries," said Everardo, 18, who did not want his last name used. Fidel's death may now give a symbolic and psychological freedom to Raul to act as he sees fit. And Cuba's relationship with the Castro brothers' historic adversary, the United States, has been transformed.

Advertisement In December 2014, Raul Castro and President Obama announced that their countries were renewing diplomatic ties after a half-century of Cold War animosity.

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Though Washington's trade embargo against Cuba remained in place, the new joint initiative spurred fresh economic exchanges involving various sectors, including airlines, banks, hotels and agribusiness. The death of Fidel Castro will not fundamentally change this route.

Raul Castro has resisted, and, even without Fidel looking over his shoulder, he is not likely to budge. After decades of animosity, the Cuban leadership warily views U. Repeatedly, Cuba's leader has insisted that there would be no acceptance of multiparty politics or basic freedoms such as the right to assembly.

The government in Cuba is controlled by a Communist Party council that serves as a legislative body and is consulted a few times a year for new laws.

Despite Fidel Castro's death, few expect rapid political changes in Cuba

Fidel, and Raul after him, have had all-but-complete control of the body. Last year, a pair of candidates tried to become the first non-Communist politicians to win municipal posts, mounting a modest campaign. The lesson to would-be reformers was clear. Miguel Diaz-Canel, named by Raul Castro as first vice president on the same day he announced his impending retirement, is widely seen as his heir apparent. Diaz-Canel, from a younger generation, is more modern than the Castros and much more Internet-savvy.

But it remains difficult to anticipate his moves. He is beholden to the old Communist Party apparatus but also eager to move Cuba into the modern world, Cubans who know him say.

For Trump, opposing forces are keen. After Raul Castro's retirement, Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress will be able to argue they are operating in a truly "post-Castro" environment, allowing them to make even more business deals. But opposition to any rapprochement with communist Cuba remains deep, especially among Cuban American Republicans in south Florida. Advertisement Few expect a swift end to the U. By tweaking regulations, Obama has done almost everything within his power to lift embargo restrictions.

Economy, politics, and health status in Cuba.

But only Congress can end the embargo, and it has refused to do so. Now, with Republicans holding sway in Washington, lifting the embargo seems a long shot, though Trump has not publicly signaled his intentions with respect to the trade ban.

With the passing of Fidel Castro, it also seems possible that the island leadership will want to reaffirm its commitment to the core principles of the man who personified the revolution. The nine-day mourning period declared in Cuba appears, at least publicly, as a means of cementing Fidel's legacy, not rejecting it.

Havana "will retrench to demonstrate that the 'Revolution' survives its founder — and continues to defy the grasp of the United States," John Kavulich, president of the New York-based U. There is "nothing expected to alter the commercial, economic and political timetable," Kavulich said, "meaning, retrenching for a bit to demonstrate" a post-Fidel Castro revolutionary "stability.