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What happened to the native american population in the centuries after 1492

  • Tobacco quickly became a cash crop for export and the sustaining economic driver of Virginia and nearby colonies like Maryland;
  • Western Battles and Skirmishes, 1850-1890;
  • Christopher columbus's crew unloads the santa maria, which ran aground off the coast of haiti in 1492 native american population was happened a bit more;
  • Some of those who settled saw their new societies as tabula rasa, where the principles of justice and equality could be put into practice, without first having to dismantle existing, non-egalitarian, unjust systems.

Imagine you were amongst these first settlers. Write your own journal entry describing your first contact with the Natives.

Look at the source to get an idea of a journal entry.

  • Using primary source diary extracts, pupils are able to understand and appreciate the first encounters between European settlers and the indigenous people of North America;
  • Teachers' notes This lesson asks pupils to investigate the early contact between Europeans and Native Americans.

Make sure you cover: In 1585, English colonists attempted to settle at a place called Roanoke. The settlement lasted only for a short time. After initial friendly relations, fighting broke out with the Native Americans when they refused demands for food from English soldiers.

  • The Spanish followed with the enslavement of local aborigines in the Caribbean;
  • As the native americans enslaved by the spanish emotive account of the same experience two centuries american beginnings;
  • Greenland and the Exploration of North America, ca;
  • Mann discusses the cultural arrogance that allowed the European settlers not only to exploit the Americas but to deny that before 1492, the Americas "had no real history," being "empty of mankind and its works;
  • The number of deaths caused by European-indigenous warfare has proven difficult to determine;
  • Colonists often faced the threat of attacks from neighboring colonies, as well as from indigenous tribes and pirates.

On May 14, 1607, the first lasting English settlement in North America was established. Captain Newport led the expedition, staying until June 22nd, when he sailed back to England for supplies.

The source material in this Snapshot comes from the time between May and June, when Newport was in America. These settlers were unprepared, and did not even plant the right crops or eat the right foods. They soon encountered starvation and famine, despite stealing food from the Native Americans.

Thousands of Native Americans were also killed, either in fighting or by outbreaks of European diseases to which their bodies had no immunity. Those settlers that survived, together with new arrivals, began to cultivate the land, growing tobacco. As more settlers arrived, more Native American hunting grounds were taken, and the Native Americans began to fight back. Any chance of peaceful relations were at an end.

Teachers' notes This lesson asks pupils to investigate the early contact between Europeans and Native Americans.

European Colonization of the Americas

Using primary source diary extracts, pupils are able to understand and appreciate the first encounters between European settlers and the indigenous people of North America. Pupils are asked to explore both positive and negative aspects of these encounters, which can then be developed further in a number of ways. This is a contemporary map engraved by William Hole based on descriptions by the discoverer of Virginia, Captain John Smith. The map uses a mix of English and Native place names.

What happened to the native american population in the centuries after 1492

These are extracts from the diaries of one of the Virginia settlers, possibly Captain Gabriel Archer, and show the life of the settlers as well as their interaction with the native Americans.

The lesson could form a background to the teaching of the History Scheme of Work Unit 19: What were the effects of Tudor exploration?

The lesson also covers breadth of study National Curriculum requirements through investigation of a world study before 1900, specifically indigenous peoples of North America. The final written task offers a clear literacy opportunity, and further links with citizenship and PSHE issues could be made with teacher development.