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Comparing the catcher in the rye and hamlet

  • Love is being displayed here as an eternal medicine for the soul; therefore, perhaps grief is a punishment for loving too much?
  • Holden talks about his rampage in breaking windows in his garage with his hand;
  • The pressure to conform came mostly from the ever so popular prep schools of the time;
  • In a time where homes were prefabricated, men went to work and women stayed home; to be different from anyone was odd;
  • Swift adds a touch of ironic humour when he describes where Mary snatched the baby from:

There is also a dysfunctional quality about both of them. Though the murder of his father may have triggered it, Hamlet's general attitude is disrespectful and dismissive toward his mother and the others at court. He sees something false.

  • Waterland and Hamlet We have so large base of authors that we can prepare a unique summary of any book;
  • Indeed, Swift portrays the father-daughter relationship as nothing other than flawed.

Hamlet and Holden are both outsiders—and perceive themselves as such—who question the "establishment" and rebel against the conventional norms by which they are expected to behave as they interact with others and with the surrounding world.

Though the murder of his father may have triggered it, Hamlet 's general attitude is disrespectful and dismissive toward his mother and the others at court. He sees something false and ridiculous about all of them.

Comparison and contrast between The Catcher in the Rye and Hamlet.

Holden Caulfield tends to have a similar stance toward people in his own world. His prep school, and the high esteem in which it's held, is something he regards as "strictly for the birds.

It is similar to the way Hamlet views his uncle, PoloniusLaertesand all the self-important people in the court. The differences between these two iconic characters are, to a degree, rooted in the changed conditions of life between the time in which Hamlet takes place the late Middle Ages and Holden's world of the 1950s.

  1. Neither has any way of getting money except as an allowance. Ironically it appears as if Holden notices how much he thinks about his deseeded brother.
  2. All thirty-two years of them. Things like homosexuality, something that Holden deals with when he visits his professor were seen as rebellion to the society.
  3. Although he acknowledges missing him, he never really acknowledges it as a problem. Both authors present us with more than one duality, perpetuating realism through loud and quiet flaws of character; creating the impact of the father from start to finish in their texts.
  4. This may be because he is much younger than Hamlet and still has to grow up before he can have much freedom or opportunity to act on his own initiative.
  5. Atkinson in physicality he is. As for Hamlet he is in inner turmoil as to take revenge on his uncle for killing his father for the throne.

But even if Holden lived in the 1300s, or in Shakespeare's relatively less violent time the late 16th centuryand was tasked with avenging the murder of someone in his family, it is hard to imagine him contemplating the kind of violent retaliation Hamlet plans and delays throughout the play. Holden is far more passive and unsure of himself than Hamlet.

This is partly because he's younger than Hamlet, but there is also a fundamental difference in character between the two that can be seen more clearly if we look at a specific segment of each of their stories. The gravedigger scene in Hamlet is a seriocomic episode in which Hamlet seems to be having fun, secure in his repartee with the others while he makes observations about life and the phoniness to use Holden's term of the establishment.

  • Not only does he miss his father dreadfully, he returns home to find his mother is banishing her grief by starting a love affair and; therefore, a new life with his paternal uncle, Claudius;
  • If the abusive father, Atkinson, had remained alive, the author would have presented the challenge from a community perspective of:

He asks rhetorically why, if it is the skull of a lawyer before him, the dead lawyer allows the knave of a gravedigger to hit him with a dirty shovel and does not "tell him of his action of battery. A scene in Catcher in the Rye that is potentially just as humorous is where the young girl who is a sex worker is sent to Holden's room.

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The girl's procurer pushes Holden around and brings him close to tears. Holden is far less mature and far more innocent and vulnerable than Hamlet.

  1. Both Hamlet and Holden are faced with the pressures of society, both of which cause them to conform to something they see as not real or fake. Indeed, Swift portrays the father-daughter relationship as nothing other than flawed.
  2. Holden is far less mature and far more innocent and vulnerable than Hamlet.
  3. Holden Caulfield tends to have a similar stance toward people in his own world.

He also does not have the streak of cruelty that Hamlet shows. We could not imagine Holden talking to Sally or any other girl the way Hamlet does to Opheliafor instance.

Yet the crucial similarity between the two characters is still their rebellious, non-conformist mindset. Hamlet and Holden are both alienated, angry young men, and they are both prototypes of the outsider who feels himself a misfit, lost in a world he does not fully understand.