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Computers and the future in nine tomorrows by isaac asimov

It amazes me at how much Asimov can pack into such a small amount of space.

Nine Tomorrows

He continues to blow me away with his thoughtful, critical, complex science fiction. I wanted more than just the nine "tomorrows!

  1. And then there's "The Last Question," in which Asimov theorizes on nothing less than the end of the universe 10 trillion years in the future...
  2. In "The Gentle Vultures," the author tells us that an alien race has been living on the Moon's far side for several decades, waiting for Earth's Cold War to blow up so that they might come to our aid... And then there's "The Last Question," in which Asimov theorizes on nothing less than the end of the universe 10 trillion years in the future...
  3. I wanted more than just the nine "tomorrows!
  4. This is a truly mind-expanding short story that offers much food for thought in its 12 pages. Has anyone else noticed this?
  5. And then there's "The Last Question," in which Asimov theorizes on nothing less than the end of the universe 10 trillion years in the future...

Aug 18, 2011 Sandy rated it really liked it Isaac Asimov may very well be the most prolific author in modern history. With over 500 books to his credit 506, to be exact. One of these 500 volumes, "Nine Tomorrows," is a collection of short stories that Doc Ike first had published in various magazines during the period July '56 to November '58. As the Isaac Asimov may very well be the most prolific author in modern history.

See a Problem?

The collection kicks off with the longest tale, "Profession," in which Asimov presents a 65th century when one's vocation is determined by a kind of computerized psychological profile, and in which youngsters compete in Olympics-style games for plum jobs on other planets.

But what happens if it is deemed that you're cut out for nothing at all? That's what happens to young George Platen, in this consistently interesting tale. Asimov does make one rare goof in this story: George should be 20, not 19, by the story's end.

Nine tomorrows : tales of the near future.

Has anyone else noticed this? In "The Feeling of Power," Asimov tells us of a scientist who is actually capable of doing simple math problems on paper gasp!

But the old ways of doing things lead to nothing but trouble, in this brilliantly cynical tale. Asimov has been called "the Agatha Christie of Science Fiction," and in "The Dying Night," a murder mystery of sorts, we see an early example of how he earned that title.

A scientist lies dead, his papers on mass transference stolen, and three of his old school chums are suspect. This somewhat contrived story nonetheless leads to a satisfactory conclusion that most readers will never foresee.

The 1965 observations of Mercury, by the way, have dated the science in the tale, but this is certainly nothing that Asimov could have foreseen in July '56. What is certainly the most humorous tale in the bunch comes next: This one really had me chuckling out loud, and winds up very amusingly indeed.

In "The Gentle Vultures," the author tells us that an alien race has been living on the Moon's far side for several decades, waiting for Earth's Cold War to blow up so that they might come to our aid. Asimov would have us believe that these folks are the source of the 1940s' and '50s' UFO's, and who knows. Anyway, the interaction between the chimplike aliens and their kidnapped Earthling is very well done in this unique tale.

In "All the Troubles of the World," a computer is responsible for not only caring for everyone on Earth, but also for predicting and preventing crimes. Is it possible that this 1958 story was inspired in part by P.

  • One of these 500 volumes, "Nine Tomorrows," is a collection of short stories that Doc Ike first had published in various magazines during the period July '56 to November '58;
  • George should be 20, not 19, by the story's end;
  • This is a truly mind-expanding short story that offers much food for thought in its 12 pages;
  • In "The Feeling of Power," Asimov tells us of a scientist who is actually capable of doing simple math problems on paper gasp!

Dick's "Minority Report," published two years before? The story is very clever, though, and has a most touching ending. A way-out surprise ending caps off another very clever Asimov short story. And then there's "The Last Question," in which Asimov theorizes on nothing less than the end of the universe 10 trillion years in the future.

Find a copy in the library

This is a truly mind-expanding short story that offers much food for thought in its 12 pages. The collection wraps up with perhaps my favorite story of the bunch, "The Ugly Little Boy. The tale should be instructive to all those critics who have accused Asimov of being unable to depict convincing female characters.

  • The 1965 observations of Mercury, by the way, have dated the science in the tale, but this is certainly nothing that Asimov could have foreseen in July '56;
  • In "The Feeling of Power," Asimov tells us of a scientist who is actually capable of doing simple math problems on paper gasp!
  • A scientist lies dead, his papers on mass transference stolen, and three of his old school chums are suspect.

The ending of this tale is nicely sentimental, and lingers long in the memory. Thus ends a really fine collection of stories from one of sci-fi's true masters. Trust me, you'll wish there were 20 tomorrows here, instead of just nine!