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Critical thinking lesson plans for 3rd grade

Objectives of the Remodeled Lesson K-1 compare perspectives of a mother and daughter in a story explore the thoughts underlying the feelings regarding what makes things valuable generate and assess solutions clarify values and develop criteria to evaluate toys A Teddy bear named Corduroy sits on a shelf at a large department store. A little girl sees him and wants to buy him, but her mother says no because they are out of time and the teddy bear is missing a button.

After the store closes, the bear searches for his button because he wants to be bought by the child. He looks all over the store and finally ends up in the bed department where he sees a button on a mattress and tries to pull it off. He falls off the mattress, knocks over a lamp and the night guard finds him and returns him to the toy department. The child returns, buys him, sews on the button and Corduroy happily joins her family. Students are asked questions like the following: How did he get his name?

Does anyone know what the material called corduroy looks and feels like? Pass around a piece of corduroy. Why did Corduroy go out into the store?

Remodeled Lessons: K-3

Why was it important to find his button? Where was he when he tried to pull one up? Why couldn't he get it? How did the story end? Critique The original lesson focused on a lot of factual recall and a narrow line of questioning. No other point of view was suggested, nor was there any personal tie-in. Strategies Used to Remodel S-25 reasoning dialogically: After a few minutes, stop and ask the toys how they felt, then ask the child how he or she was choosing, then ask the mother how she was choosing.

Read the story aloud and ask the following questions to encourage students to explore the story's meaning and assess Corduroy's solution: What was Corduroy doing in the store after it closed? Why did he think it was important to find the button? Do you think it was important for him to find the button?

How else could he have solved the problem of the missing button?

Developing Students' Critical Thinking Skills Through Whole-Class Dialogue

Was it really necessary for him to have a button in order for him to be bought? S-19 Do you think an adult would buy a teddy bear with a button missing? If not, why not? Why do you think the girl bought him anyway? S-15 What would you have done? How did the girl feel after she bought Corduroy?

Critical Thinking Activities for Kids

How do you know how she felt? What do you think Corduroy felt? How do you know? S-4 "Can you think of a different way to end the story? If your favorite animal could think, what would he or she have thought while being bought? The teacher could extend the discussion on the differences between the perspectives and standards of the girl and her mother a common sort of difference between children and grown-ups.

How important was the missing button to the mother? What reasons could she have? What was the most important thing about Corduroy for the mother? Why did the girl want Corduroy? Why didn't the missing button alter her feelings? Would the missing button have stopped any of the girl's plans for Corduroy?

Why or why not? What does this difference between mother and daughter tell us about their values-what they think is important? Do you think the missing button is important?

What's your best reason? What's the best reason on the other side? S-15 Have you ever seen or experienced a similar disagreement? How was it similar? What do you think of it? What does that tell us about your values? Who do you understand? Who are you rooting for? Critique The lessons we reviewed on the subject over-emphasized the flag, while de-emphasizing allegiance to the country.

They tended to confuse our ideals with our practice, thereby failing to suggest that it takes work to better live up to ideals. The common belief that loving your country means finding no fault with it is a major obstacle to critical thought. Fairminded thinking requires us to consider criticisms. The lessons we reviewed do not fully explain the ideas in the pledge; therefore, students are making a promise they don't understand.

Ideas as important and complex as 'good critical thinking lesson plans for 3rd grade aren't covered in sufficient depth. Furthermore, many lessons lead students to believe that our ideals are uniquely American, ignoring how many other countries have similar ideals.

  1. Literature discussions based on student-posed questions address an array of reading, writing, and oral language core curriculum objectives.
  2. Why do people often prefer to use man-made materials such as plastic? We would use the original lesson plan as a part of the lesson and encourage small group discussions on such questions as these.
  3. Its strength lies in its use of the mechanical techniques of the scientific method.
  4. Literature discussions based on student-posed questions address an array of reading, writing, and oral language core curriculum objectives.
  5. Ask the students for more examples.

This practice encourages sociocentric stereotyping of non-Americans. Therefore, we suggest that students discuss ideals that others share with us. The remodel can be substituted for any lesson on the pledge.

  1. Why did he think it was important to find the button? Is something a promise if you have no choice about whether or not to make it?
  2. What does that tell us about your values? S-15 Have you ever seen or experienced a similar disagreement?
  3. The teacher should point out that the students are not required to say the pledge, that they have a choice to decide whether they want to make this promise this way.

Some teachers may also want to have students critique the pledge lesson in their text. Strategies Used to Remodel S-14 clarifying and analyzing the meanings of words or phrases S-32 making plausible inferences, predictions, or interpretations S-27 comparing and contrasting ideals with actual practice S-7 developing intellectual good faith or integrity S-29 noting significant similarities and differences S-2 developing insight into egocentricity or sociocentricity We have designed this lesson as a complete third grade level discussion.

  • Do you think it was important for him to find the button?
  • The flag is a symbol of our country;
  • Strategies Used to Remodel S-31 distinguishing relevant from irrelevant facts S-32 making plausible inferences, predictions, or interpretations S-3 exercising fairmindedness First, instead of having students ask any three questions about pets, the teacher can ask them to think of at least three questions they might ask a pet seller to determine if a particular animal would be a good pet for them;
  • S-2 The next section is an introduction to the idea of a symbol;
  • What does this difference between mother and daughter tell us about their values-what they think is important?

We believe, however, that the pledge should be discussed as early as the children recite it. For first and second grades, use as much of this lesson as your students can understand.

Teachers of second and third grades may have a pre-activity. Groups of students could use the dictionary to look up the words in the pledge and rewrite the pledge in their own words. We then recommend a thorough discussion of the pledge, such as that described below.

A pledge is a promise. Critical thinking lesson plans for 3rd grade is a promise? How do you feel when someone breaks a promise to you? Is something a promise if you have no choice about whether or not to make it?

S-14 Allegiance is loyalty. Use 'allegiance to a friend' as an analogy to enhance discussion. So we are making a promise to be loyal. The flag is a symbol of our country. If necessary, discuss the meaning of 'symbol'.

To be loyal to the flag is to show respect for it. We do this as a way of showing respect for our nation. Discuss our country's name. That means that we have the right to pick our leaders. Compare this to other forms of government. Do people in every country get to pick their leaders? If we select our leaders, then who is responsible for our government?

Discuss how the country is made up of land, people, and government, and so we have to care for all three. Our country has ideals, some of which are in the pledge. Use households as an analogy to generate a discussion of why unity is important. Define 'liberty' and 'justice'. We say "with liberty and justice for all. How do you feel when you are treated unfairly? How would you feel if you couldn't decide anything for yourself? Then discuss that last phrase, and ask who is meant by 'all'?

Is the idea that everyone is free and is always treated fairly a fact or an ideal? S-27 What is the difference between a fact and an ideal? Discuss Are freedom and fairness easy or hard for a country to achieve? Discuss S-7 Therefore, when we say the pledge, we promise to respect the flag and be good citizens. Since we live critical thinking lesson plans for 3rd grade a republic, the citizens are responsible for the government.