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The different presentations of god during the great awakening

The fire of God was falling everywhere. Despite the fact he had delivered "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" to his own congregation with little effect, he felt led to use it again at Enfield.

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His techniques were unimpressive. He always read his sermons in an even voice, but with great conviction.

  • Every age has its self-appointed Spirit-quenchers;
  • Jonathan soon moved to Northampton, Massachusetts, to become the assistant pastor to his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard;
  • He wrote prolifically to this end;
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He shunned shouting and theatrical antics. Nothing in his style or presentation could account for what happened that day at Enfield. Edwards of Northampton who preached a most awakening sermon from these words, Deuteronomy 32: So yet ye minister was obliged to desist, ye shrieks and cry were piercing and amazing.

Few names provoke sharper reactions. For Edwards, biblical exposition was the soul, sinew, and marrow of his life and purpose. He had no interest in philosophy for its own sake. He has been denounced without measure. He replied unhesitatingly, "Edwards. His father, Timothy Edwards, graduated from Harvard and was the village pastor.

Like all youngsters of his time, Jonathan was home schooled. Because he showed the different presentations of god during the great awakening intelligence, his father enrolled him at Yale at age 13.

During graduate school, he had an intense conversion experience that radically altered his life and laid the foundation for all the profound and wonderful fruit that followed. They had 11 children, and the legacy of their posterity was phenomenal.

Jonathan soon moved to Northampton, Massachusetts, to become the assistant pastor to his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard. A few years later Stoddard died and Jonathan became senior pastor. He labored at Northampton for 21 years. Edwards understood the smallness and frailty of man. He grasped the truth that man must become small in his own eyes to be happy or useful to God. About it Edwards wrote, "A great and earnest concern about the great things of religion and eternal world became universal in all parts of the town the work of conversion was carried on in a most astonishing manner and increased more and more; souls did, as it were, by flocks come to Jesus Christ.

The citizens sang hymns in the streets, the tavern closed, the young people pursued God in bands, and it was impossible to get into church unless one arrived hours early. Then in 1740, like a great flash flood, the Great Awakening rolled through New England, and Northampton was included. It was at this time that Edwards preached "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" at Enfield with such remarkable results.

It is estimated that 10 percent of New England was converted during this time. Imagine today 28 million converted in 2 years. Picture every church in your town doubling or tripling in the next 2 years, and you have some grasp of the enormity of what happened. Many excesses accompanied the revival as people experienced highly unusual spiritual phenomenon.

Sometimes, during sermons, they screamed and dropped unconscious to the floor. Preached twice with enlargement. Many cried out; many stood trembling; the whole assembly very solemn. Almost all the Negroes in town wounded convicted of sin. I was forced to break off my sermon before done, the outcry was so great.

This mixture ensured much criticism. Every age has its self-appointed Spirit-quenchers. Edwards believed the essential work was from God. But he recognized that the entire work would be discredited and abandoned unless the church learned to sort the wheat from the chaff.

He wrote prolifically to this end. His most important work on this subject was On Religious Affections, a Christian classic still in print today by at least three publishers.

  1. Packer cites Edwards when the subject of revival arises.
  2. Banner of Truth is the best place to get to know this man.
  3. Almost all the Negroes in town wounded convicted of sin.
  4. Banner of Truth , 169.
  5. After a generation or two passed with this kind of mindset, the Colonists came to realize that political power did not reside in the hands of the English monarch, but in their own will for self-governance consider thewording of the Declaration of Independence. He replied unhesitatingly, "Edwards.

To their enduring shame, over 90 percent of the members voted to remove Mr. He was 47, still had eight children at home, and was trained to do nothing but preach. The only job he could secure was missionary work among an obscure Indian tribe on the western frontier of Massachusetts. In utter isolation, he ministered to this small congregation and faithfully used the different presentations of god during the great awakening years to write most of his great theological treatises.

Eight years later, at age 55, he accepted a call from Princeton Theological Seminary to be its next president. A few months after the move, but before Sarah and the children could join him, he contracted smallpox and died. First, Edwards was preeminently the theologian of revival. No one else matches his penetrating insights. Everyone from Michael Brown to J. Packer cites Edwards when the subject of revival arises. Second, Edwards is important because eternity saturated his thought life.

He constantly leads his reader to heaven, hell, or the judgment seat of Christ. His perspective was eternal, and his insights were amazing. Those who read Edwards lose their fear of death. They exult in the hope of sharing the glory of God, and they shudder at the horrors of damnation. Third, Edwards knew and loved a big God. Whatever you now think about God, He will be bigger, bolder, and more satisfying after reading Edwards.

Some people go on vacation to get refreshed; I go to the 18th century and read Edwards. For there I find the sovereign, omnipotent, omniscient God who is gracious and good beyond human comprehension. It divides joints and marrow, redirecting men from themselves to God and His sufficiency. Discover Jonathan Edwards for yourself. History is His story.

Farley is editor of The Raven, a free monthly publication whose mission is to proclaim the faith and doctrine of the Reformers with a special emphasis on the felt power of the Holy Spirit, published by Pinnacle Communications, Spokane, WA. Call 1-888-622-4170 for your free annual subscription.

For His Glory, by William P. Farley, can be ordered from Pinnacle Press, P. Box 8146, Spokane, WA 99203 or by calling 1-888-622-4170. Banner of Truth169. Westminster John Knox Press. Fleming Revell, 1977242. Banner of Truth, 1976201. Banner of Truth, 1987361. Banner of Truth is the best place to get to know this man. Christian History magazine has devoted Vol.