Essays academic service


The negative characteristics of jack in jack and the beanstalk

A Giant terrorised the area, stealing cattle and carrying them away. Jack devised a trap, whereby he dug a pit, covered it with sticks, and lured the Giant to his doom- he did this by blowing his horn to attract him. After defeating this Giant, he went on to do many heroic deeds throughout Cornwall, and on occasion in Wales. He often has a magic sword. The Beanstalk does not feature in this legend- the addition of the magic beans, the hen that lays golden eggs and the singing harp were yet to be created.

The Grandmother possesses a magic bean which Jack purloins and plants. The Beanstalk grows at an incredible rate, the Grandmother turns into a Toad and chases Jack up the Beanstalk! The names of Gog and Magog of course are the legendary Giants who protected London- their effigies can be found today carved into a church front on Fleet Street, and have the hills near Cambridge named after them.

Obviously these names were combined in this version to make one The negative characteristics of jack in jack and the beanstalk. In ancient legends an Ash Tree stretches to heaven, and a branch of the Bo-tree of Buddha reaches for the sky. Theatrical legend has it that the Giant Beanstalk was so tall that Miss Povey refused point blank to climb it, as it towered over the stage at Drury Lane.

This privilege went to a young boy named Sullivan. The Nation was at that time engaged in the Boer War. The Boer War was eleven weeks old when the pantomime opened. Our hero Jack has a name that will not change- after all, his is the title role!

Mostly he is Jack Trott. In other cultures and versions of folklore he has been called Hans, Juan and Jean. Frankie Howerd played Simple Simon in many productions, including the Palladium.

When this character is not a King, he has been a Squire, or a Baron. There is no traditional name. Originating I think from John Crocker the panto author and often has a name connected with the garden — but there is no set traditional name for this character. The traditional name for the Giant who lives atop of Beanstalk Land is Blunderbore. Jack is then captured by the Giant Blunderbore, who he strangles to death! Also features Clarice Mayne.

Link will open in Windows Media Player - alternatively you can download it for free or purchase one with a higher definition from www. Reading the original Fairy Tale, it is noticeable that the moral is all important to the story. She is not the kindest fairy in the wood however. It is a strong moral tale about retribution and revenge. The pantomime version today, due to the restraints of time, and possibly the chopping down of not the beanstalk, but the plot- is very thin on morality.

  • The audience already knows that Jack and his daughter are very much in love, and will back this up with a love ballad-duet;
  • The Beanstalk does not feature in this legend- the addition of the magic beans, the hen that lays golden eggs and the singing harp were yet to be created.

It is highly likely that Fairy and Villain would trade insults. The Village or Courtyard: In this scene, after an opening song and dance-possibly fronted by Jack or the Princess- the characters would be introduced.

Jack (Jack and the Beanstalk)

We would learn that Blunderbore has made demands repeatedly for food, cattle and money. The King and his subjects have given him all their money, and are now very poor. However, he is a poor lad with no prospects. One plot shortcut would be for the King to declare that the person who rid his land of Blunderbore would marry his daughter. The audience already knows that Jack and his daughter are very much in love, and will back this up with a love ballad-duet.

The Dame reveals she has no more money for food or rent. Oh you mean Henchman?

  • A short front cloth possibly, wherin the Fairy reveals that all is not lost, and that, through her magic those beans are now Magic beans;
  • Jack travelled alone in the original story, but in recent years it has not been practical to leave the rest of the cast behind- earth-bound;
  • This scene is one of the most problematic in Pantoland;
  • This privilege went to a young boy named Sullivan;
  • The pantomime version today, due to the restraints of time, and possibly the chopping down of not the beanstalk, but the plot- is very thin on morality.

A frontcloth would follow the main village scene, to allow for resetting- this could entail a love duet between Jack and the Princess —or, more likely another scene between the Fairy and the Evil Henchman. More threats would be levelled at Jack, but the Fairy would hint that she had some powerful magic ready to help Jack on his quest.

This will involve overturned Milking buckets, stools that are kicked off-stage, a misunderstanding of which end is which, and general well rehearsed comic mayhem! After the Milking scene it might be the time plot-wise for Dame Trott to realise she has to sell Daisy, and Jack is instructed to take her to market and get the best price for her.

It is very important that we believe that Daisy really IS their best friend, and, handled well, this can be a moment of true magic, as the Dame bids farewell to her friend- often with a gentle song, watching tearfully as Daisy is led away by Jack. The Villain offers to buy Daisy, and offers Jack a bag of gold. In some versions Jack is offered beans, and is told they are magic beans.

On The Way Home: A short front cloth possibly, wherin the Fairy reveals that all is not lost, and that, through her magic those beans are now Magic beans. She cannot be kidnapped too early, otherwise she will not be seen until well into act two.

This dirty deed inspires Jack even more to fight the giant. Allowing in some productions a comic scene with the Dame, preparing for bed. Jack returns, and proudly hands over his prize. The Dame opens it and is beside herself with anger. If Jack knows they are magic beans he will be shouted down. The Dame throws the beans through the window, or into the garden, and exits in tears. Jack retires to bed, and the scene is set for a transformation. The Transformation- The Beanstalk: The stage is set for lighting changes, and the entrance of the Fairy.

The chorus will be dressed as Fairies or spirits of the Beanstalk. The beanstalk will grow slowly, and, by various effects will be revealed- hopefully a sturdy towering Beanstalk ready for Jack to climb. Beanstalks vary, depending on scene construction, and the facilities at the theatre. In some Theatres a beanstalk will grow out of the pit, in another it will emerge from an onstage trap. The Final part of the Transformation is when the Dame and Simon discover the Beanstalk the next morning, summon the King, the Princes and any villagers who are not frantically changing out of Fairy ballet costumes!

Jack is often revealed magically transformed into a glittering costume- especially if the part is played by a girl, and the negative characteristics of jack in jack and the beanstalk often given a magic sword by the fairy. The scene concludes with either a big chorus number, or with a solo number from Jack as he approaches and starts to climb the stalk.

Often Act Two will open with a scene half way up the Beanstalk, with many glittering costumes on display as Jack meets the Fairy and the inhabitants of Cloudland. Jack travelled alone in the original story, but in recent years it has not been practical to leave the rest of the cast behind- earth-bound. Once inside the castle, the scene is set for what is often the first appearance of the Giant.

This scene would usually involve Fleshcreep setting up the entrance of the Giant.

  1. Frankie Howerd played Simple Simon in many productions, including the Palladium.
  2. Jack notices the two possessions of the Giant, a magical harp who sings by himself, and a goose who puts golden eggs, which the Giant uses to make golden coins.
  3. The Transformation- The Beanstalk.
  4. The Wedding scene and finale can take place in any scenic place the designer wishes- there is no specific place or palace to set this scene. However, in some versions of the story Jack is the hero as the the giant would plunder his village, and Jack is just returning what has been stolen.
  5. A Somewhat Unorthodox Explanation Since many will question Jack's inclusion on this wiki as a villain we shall try to explain his crimes in a rather humorous way, though this is a factual account.

In some productions the Giant will be a very sturdy costume, often strengthened with an aluminium harness. The actor who has the most difficult role in the panto will most likely be very tall, strapped into stilt like boots- the stilts are not unlike those worn by plasterers to reach high ceilings.

The hands will not be his own, and inside he will have a number of pulleys to work the eyes and the mouth of the giant. More often than not his voice will be pre-recorded, otherwise you would just hear loud gasping as the actor struggles to move and manipulate the costume! There were circus troupes and families who specialised in performing the Giant, his wife and all their children in this scene. In this scene the Giant will be pandered to by Fleshcreep, and amuse himself by taunting the imprisoned Princess.

  • An enraged Giant will discover Jack with his treasure, and they flee the scene;
  • Jack returns, and proudly hands over his prize.

Jack will greet the Princess, and hide himself away for the return of the giant. Huge props and trucks are often required for this scene- a Giant table and chair perhaps, a huge Dresser, oven and cooking pots.

Daisy the Cow will be discovered safe and sound.

Jack and the Beanstalk Character Description Writing Frames

An enraged Giant will discover Jack with his treasure, and they flee the scene. Or foot of the Beanstalk: Either way, nobody really seems to notice.

The audience is too busy watching Jack climb down the beanstalk, and rush to find his trusty axe! This scene is one of the most problematic in Pantoland. How to show, on stage the Giant descending the Beanstalk impossible, as the actor has difficulty walking in the costume- climbing is not possible and falling to the ground.

In some productions this is performed in the style of Greek Theatre- we have to use our imaginations and follow the sound effects. Another will discover the Giant already dead when a cloth lifts to reveal him. The plot is wrapped up. The Giant is dead, Jack, Simon and Dame Trott are rich, and the King very graciously allows his daughter to marry our hero.

The Wedding scene and finale can take place in any scenic place the designer wishes- there is no specific place or palace to set this scene. Lavish, spectacular and a wonderful story! Other links which may be of interest.