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The theme of past affecting your future in everyday use by alice walker

Apr 27, 2015 Leslie rated it liked it In the story "Every Day Use," the author, Alice Walker, states about the relationships that occurs inside a family when one of their offspring is shipped abroad to further continue her studies.

  • It was Grandma Dee and Big Dee who taught her how to quilt herself;
  • It is significant that Maggie knew the history of the dasher because Dee, who knew nothing of its history, and was not even sure what she would do with it, took it with no thought for either Maggie or Mama.

In the story, the author further reveals what happens to the family by limitlessly supporting Dee and not trying to overcome themselves as well. The mother, the backbone in the family, is the narrator of the story, switching from third person to first person.

Everyday Use

The story further exposes the struggle and the In the story "Every Day Use," the author, Alice Walker, states about the relationships that occurs inside a family when one of their offspring is shipped abroad to further continue her studies.

The story further exposes the struggle and the dreams of having higher education at all costs.

  • The quilts, which in a sense symbolize the family's past and the family's heritage, are important to her only as material things that she can display;
  • I have seen these programs;
  • Maggie is ashamed of scars she suffered in a fire during her childhood;
  • Her appreciation for the dasher and the quilts is based on love for the people who made and used them.

The author illustrates a situation that is common in many families by highlighting a story that involves a family surpassing difficulties with their living situation, as well as the struggle that it takes to become educated. Mama is the narrator in this story; she is the mother of Dee and Maggie.

  • The mother, the backbone in the family, is the narrator of the story, switching from third person to first person;
  • She regards her mother and sister as relics of the past, although she sees how she can use the quilts to her own advantage in the present and in years to come;
  • Her appreciation for the dasher and the quilts is based on love for the people who made and used them;
  • It is a real heritage that is comprised of real people;
  • Maggie has long been reticent and shy and intimidated by Dee.

Dee is the daughter that makes it out of poverty and becomes educated because her Mama did the impossible to make sure she became someone important in life. When Dee returns home, she seems to be transformed in so many ways and changing her name was the top notch. Even though the characters are portrayed as tragic, Alice walker was trying to make a point here.

Many people have it difficult to become educated and gamble everything for at least one of their family members to get an education. Mama does the impossible for her daughter, Dee, to go off to college and pursue a career.

And, Dee is the daughter who is supported endlessly and at the end shows no sympathy for where she came from.

  1. It is not as pleasing as a colorful African heritage that can be fabricated, like a quilt, from bits and pieces that one finds attractive. According to the mother, Maggie has poor vision, is not especially attractive, is not especially intelligent, has little money, and seems destined to marry a local man.
  2. She stumbles along good naturedly but can't see well.
  3. These personality traits, along with her style of dress and speech, establish her identity as a symbol of the Black Power movement. She sees her mother and her sister — the two women whose name Dee has rejected.

Sometimes the mother and father weep, the child wraps them in her arms and leans across the table to tell how she would not have made it without their help. I have seen these programs.

  1. Later, she eats the food Mama prepared. Mama is the narrator in this story; she is the mother of Dee and Maggie.
  2. This story is immensely sad because you see it does happen in families and how they forget where they came from and who helped them. She uses the principal characters of Mama, Dee Wangero , and Maggie to clarify this theme.
  3. Have you ever seen a lame animal, perhaps a dog run over by some careless person rich enough to own a car, sidle up to someone who is ignorant enough to be kind to him? It is important to recognize that Walker is not condemning the Black Power movement as a whole.
  4. DEE Unlike her mother, Dee is not intimidated by anyone.

Sometimes I dream a dream in which Dee and I are suddenly brought together on a TV program of this sort. The idea of only one person benefiting out of this whole situation is catastrophic and ironically egoistic.

Mama seemed so delighted on the return of her daughter Dee. But to her disadvantage, her daughter ended up changing ultimately everything about herself, even her name.

This goes to show that an education can change the aspects of a person and their way of seeing others. This story is immensely sad because you see it does happen in families and how they forget where they came from and who helped them.