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A discussion about the geographical social political and economic status of japan

Ken Leave a Comment on Japan in Perspective: Economic and Social Issues Japan in Perspective: Economic and Social Issues What are the challenges surrounding Japan today?

  • Sustained prosperity and high annual growth rates, which averaged 10 percent in 1955—60 and later climbed to more than 13 percent, changed all sectors of Japanese life;
  • By 1970 the average farm household income had risen higher than its urban counterpart, providing considerable rural purchasing power;
  • Leadership and Political Officials;
  • In 1910, Japan annexed Korea;
  • Political democracy was encouraged; and leftist groups agitated for political freedom and workers' rights;
  • Ken Leave a Comment on Japan in Perspective:

Where do they come from and how might we solve them? These are questions that thousands of economists and politicians both inside and outside of Japan are delving into answering, and I think that they are questions that are worth looking into. After all, Japan still has the third largest economy in the world, and its soft power is certainly not lacking in gravity.

However, most people pay less attention to the other side of Japan, the one behind the anime and manga that it produces, the one masked by its sakura blossoms and strange toilet seats. And so, today, we shall be focusing on the other side of Japan; its less pretty economic, social and political realities. Japan currently has a disproportionate age population—the population of young people tend to fall short in comparison to that of the elderly.

In a country with heavy health care coverage, these circumstances subsequently results in heavy taxes on the younger work force in order to defray the necessary costs.

Respecting and cherishing the elderly is an important part of Japanese culture, and I believe that this supportive system has many merits, but it is evident that this imbalance is an obstacle for Japan in both social and economic facets. He even created a new minister position officially translated as Minister in Charge of Promoting Dynamic Engagement of All Citizens to ensure that Japan will create a strong and hopeful future for the country.

One of the most recent Abenomics policies is the negative interest rate.

Japan in Perspective: Economic and Social Issues

Simply put, this intended to encourage Japanese citizens and businesses to spend more money in order to revitalize the economy instead of storing it into banks, which is thought to be the cause of stagnation.

Though with a lot of media coverage and recent global instability, there have been voices that people have been reacting too sensitively towards this, thus making the issue much larger than it is supposed to be. Ironically, rather than ameliorating the entire economy, this seems to of have only simulated one corner of the Japanese market: More people are now buying safes to store their money because they feel more comfortable having their money in their houses rather than keeping it in a bank.

In other words, people are currently afraid of spending their money due to the volatility of the future. Past events such as the Bubble Burst and the Lehman Shock have instigated fear within the people of Japan, and as a result people have become reluctant in spending their money even if they wanted to, and have instead chosen to protect their wealth with their own hands.

In the passage below, Ken has not only brought up the economic difficulties, but has also raised the social imbroglios that have largely affected the Japanese society. To many, it is an example of a nation that can fall down and rise back up greater than ever before. Prime minister Shinzo Abe has a discussion about the geographical social political and economic status of japan his Abenomic policies to return Japan to growth, but the policies have had little effect thus far.

Most notably, China has been experiencing a severe economic slowdown and is no longer able to sustain double-digit growth, which has resulted in a decrease in Chinese aggregate demand for the goods of other nations, causing the impact of its slowdown to reverberate through the globe. As The New York Times writes: Its population and work force are shrinking…With the economy on the edge, even small setbacks can have major repercussions…Exports to China dropped sharply, worsening the falloff in activity and contributing to the general unease.

Economy of Japan

The international economic outlook is hardly promising for Japan, and it would be difficult to remedy this situation; the Chinese government is still trying to muster resources to combat its own slowdown. But this is a sideshow. Roughly a third of its population is above the age of 60, which places a huge strain on the Japanese economy; retirement benefits and health care must be ensured for the elderly, as they deserve for their previous service to the nation, but this in turn increases the contribution required from younger taxpayers.

This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the pool of people who can work is decreasing; people are getting older, but the young are having less babies: Traditional and corporate culture in Japan has led to women being an underutilised resource in the Japanese economy, and only around sixty percent of women between the age of 15 and 64 are actually working.

The expensiveness and time-consuming process of childcare and the traditional prominence of men in leadership positions are key factors to why the labor participation rate of women are still relatively low in Japan. Abe has argued that a way to offset the decreasing workforce would be to bring more women into the workforce, thus making up for those retiring.

Legislation was passed requiring companies to set numerical targets for how many women they would put in leadership positions, but these womenomics policies has not seen much success. Similarly, policies to try to raise fertility has not been very successful. This would be allowing more immigration from outside Japan, giving foreign labourers an opportunity to come work inside the country. It sounds simple, but this would possibly be the most difficult policy to pursue by any Japanese government.

For its entire history, Japan has remained an ethnically homogeneous country; to start allowing low-skilled foreign workers to pour into its borders risks damaging the underlying social fabric that has always defined the country. According to a poll conducted by the daily Yomiuri Shinbun in April last year, a majority of Japanese appear to agree.

Europe is facing its biggest migration crisis in recent memory; the United States is grappling with the issue of an insecure border. Everywhere, countries with a migration issue is debating whether to accept the migrants. With Japan, the situation is slightly different. Migration has not yet happened, but it is clear that Japan needs it; the question is whether or not to allow it to happen.

Economic stagnation, demographic decline, an unfavourable international economic situation; this is not a helpful environment for growth. From the perspective of an outsider, however, it would also be foolish to think that Japan would not be able to resolve its challenges.

The Japanese people are creative and energetic, and I would be excited to see the solutions that they come up to resolve their current problems.

Now to return to some more comments by Jin: Though as a child I lived in the United States for about a decade, and eventually moved to Japan several years ago. I speak English and Japanese, and a little bit of French. Identity is crucial in the 21st century, and I consider it acceptable and important for people to cherish their own unique race.

  1. Postwar Japan as History, 1993. Topography The Japanese islands are covered by mountains, most of them heavily forested, and crisscrossed by short, swift rivers.
  2. The medieval period ended in a century of civil war lasting from the late fifteenth to the late sixteenth century. Meiji leaders balanced Western powers again each other to avoid domination by any single patron.
  3. I consider myself to lean towards a liberal, left-wing perspective, and I sometimes feel that accepting a massive amount of refugees may benefit the society, but when I look at Japan as a whole and the people who live in it, it feels inevitable that Japan cannot move forward regarding the topic of accepting refugees into this country. Trade relationships with mainland China developed slowly in the absence of diplomatic ties.
  4. The trade dwindled under renewed Chinese competition by the 1740s, before resuming after the opening of Japan in the mid-19th century. Domestic companies became consumers of Western technology and applied it to the production of goods that could be sold cheaply on the world market.

Another problem that arises here is how foreigners or people such as hafus and kikokushijos although comparatively lighter are regarded. One speech given at TEDx Kyoto 2013 accurately addresses the concerns of most hafus and kikokushijos, which can be viewed by clicking here. Before continuing, I would like to clear the misconception that people in Japan are either simply racist or xenophobic. Since this is a very delicate and tough issue, I can only briefly touch the surface of this issue in this post, however, I hope to present enough information for the readers to be able to form their own general opinions.

It is sometimes because of that admiration or difference that cause most jyun-japas to either take the humble approach where they admire the personthe defensive approach, or the neutral approach, which is the most preferred in my opinion. Unlike the United States, where your citizenship determines your nationality, the most popular conception in Japan is that your appearance defines your ethnicity. Especially in a homogenous society such as Japan and Korea, people can be dull or insensitive to racial issues because the environment lacks ethnic diversity.

This may be one of the reasons that led to the inconsiderate statements presented by Ayako Sono. Though despite this, I still really like Japan and the people in this country. There is a lot that I can talk about in terms of how I define myself and how I feel in regards to this issue, but that is a topic that I feel should not be tackled at this time.

The point of me raising this issue is because I wanted for the readers to understand the social difficulties that envelope Japan in regards to accepting foreigners as citizens of this country.

Please do not misunderstand: Japan is a great country to visit for tourism or maybe even a honeymoon. I personally enjoy the historical temples and culture of Japan, as well as the delicious and healthy food. The identity issues that I brought up above may only be of true importance to people who have a desire to fit in or to live in the Japanese society, especially if he or she does not appear or speak Japanese.

Prime Minister Abe has been criticized for only accepting 11 out of over 5000 applicants for asylum to Japan. His response to this is covered by The Guardian, which can be viewed by clicking herebut besides his counterarguments brought up in the article, I feel that Japan would be a difficult environment for Syrians and other refugees to live in just because of the ethnic and language restrictions that have yet to be overcome.

Japan is notorious for having one of the worst TOEFL iBT scores in Asia despite being such a prosperous country within the region, and major reforms in English education are being discussed. Of course, accepting a massive amount of refugees may end up being a major breakthrough in terms of global ethnic understanding, but a sudden flow of foreigners may cause a new type of confusion or anxiety never seen before. Japan has instead given large financial contributions to the United Nations to support these refugees.

A stable society with a proper population balance and gender equity can surely open up new doors towards advancement, and may eventually lead to a less conservative perspective. I consider myself to lean towards a liberal, left-wing perspective, and I sometimes feel that accepting a massive amount of refugees may benefit the society, but when A discussion about the geographical social political and economic status of japan look at Japan as a whole and the people who live in it, it feels inevitable that Japan cannot move forward regarding the topic of accepting refugees into this country.

  1. Urban life also brought about changes in traditional Japanese family and gender relationships.
  2. Political democracy was encouraged; and leftist groups agitated for political freedom and workers' rights.
  3. An extensive system of national health insurance provides access to high quality health care for almost all people through a combination of public hospitals and physicians in private practice.
  4. Vegetarian cuisine prepared in Zen monasteries relied heavily on soy products, including miso soup and tofu. Living space for most urban dwellers was infinitesimal when compared with Western societies.
  5. This would be allowing more immigration from outside Japan, giving foreign labourers an opportunity to come work inside the country.

Most policies implemented in order to tackle the existing socio-economic issues have thus far failed to produce any positive long-term results. Though one thing is certain: