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A discussion on the online access to the news

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  • This includes loyalty to news sources, trust in information from news organizations, discussion of news with others and level of engagement with news on social media;
  • TV remains the dominant screen, followed by digital;
  • Stelera Wireless is another company providing similar solutions to rural areas;
  • Based on lower cost of broadband and new technology, print newspapers will have to work hard for survival.

We aim to lead the world in research and education. News is the most important source of information about politics and public affairs for most citizens, as few of us have any real personal contact with politicians.

  • Second, the journalistic profession does not fare much better;
  • His viewpoint may inspire further thought;
  • The challenge for politicians can be, however, that as engaged and often vocal as these news lovers are, they are still a minority, and many people may feel they have more important things to do than follow the latest liveblog or tweet from Westminster;
  • Stelera Wireless is another company providing similar solutions to rural areas.

But where do people in the UK get their news in the run-up to the General Election? Research from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford gives the answer — and the answer is online and from television. The campaign is therefore not only fought on the doorstep and the TV screen, but also increasingly on the internet.

The Modern News Consumer

This changing media environment provides the arena in which political actors fight for our votes. Recent years have seen the gradual erosion of television as the single most widely used source of news, to the point that by 2016 it has been overtaken by online sources in terms of reach — at least amongst the 92 percent of the UK population who has access to the internet.

  1. Research from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford gives the answer — and the answer is online and from television. When it comes to news attitudes and habits, the two groups are quite similar.
  2. But where do people in the UK get their news in the run-up to the General Election? This may eventually hurt small town newspapers too.
  3. This changing media environment provides the arena in which political actors fight for our votes.
  4. This reputation affects the ranking of their articles based on acknowledged authority, which is determined by reader activity. Search engines and social media thus seem to lead people to a wider sources of news that they would have used otherwise.

The reach of printed newspapers has declined rapidly in the same period, and social media has become much more important.

There are very clear generational divides.

Will Printed Newspapers Survive with Easy Online Access to News?

Asked to identify their main source of news, online comes out number one in every age group under 45 — and for those under 25, social media are by now more popular than television. The television news audience is still large, but it is also old — and aging — and younger people increasingly find their news from websites and apps, and via search engines and social media.

More than half of Britons access news online

By now, the BBC is the only news media organisation in the UK that reaches more people with online news than Facebook. These have become integral to how people find and access news all over the world, including in the UK.

Some worry that the growing importance of these digital intermediaries might lead to the formation of echo chambers or filter bubbles, where people only get information from a few sources that largely confirm their pre-existing views a situation we should be familiar with in the UK, given the proud tradition of partisan newspapers.

Search engines and social media thus seem to lead people to a wider sources of news that they would have used otherwise. Interestingly, the British population has a somewhat mixed view of the news they get, the media who provide it, and the journalists who produce it.

  1. This may eventually hurt small town newspapers.
  2. At least for now. Asked to identify their main source of news, online comes out number one in every age group under 45 — and for those under 25, social media are by now more popular than television.
  3. But Americans see clear distinctions between news organizations, friends and family, and more distant individuals. Why Small-Town Newspapers Have an Advantage Many search engines use technology to deliver local related results with searches.
  4. Personal contacts are also a common source of news and can play an amplified role online. The point I was making is that print newspapers, especially local versions, will have to fight for their life.
  5. This mix of the established traditions and dynamics of the British media, and rapid change driven by the preferences of a younger generation and the possibilities offered by technology companies, provides the arena in which the general election campaign of 2017 will play out.

First of all, only about a third see the media as free from undue political influence, and just over a quarter as free from undue commercial influence. Second, the journalistic profession does not fare much better.

This change is accompanied by continuity too, such as the long-running scepticism of both journalists and the news they produce, and the continued centrality of both public service media like the BBC committed to impartiality as well as private media like the Daily Mail and the Guardian with their more partisan take on the events of the day.

Major newspapers are under pressure as their print business models continue to erode, but politically, they are important because they often still set the agenda for both television and online.

Social media 'outstrips TV' as news source for young people

For some, this environment is a cornucopia of easily accessible news and information, and they embrace every opportunity at hand. The challenge for politicians can be, however, that as engaged and often vocal as these news lovers are, they are still a minority, and many people may feel they have more important things to do than follow the latest liveblog or tweet from Westminster.

  • Google provides local response to search queries;
  • But Americans see clear distinctions between news organizations, friends and family, and more distant individuals;
  • Even in small towns;
  • Still, online news organizations play the larger role:

There is a clear polarization in the news habits of more and less interested users — a polarization that is perhaps even more significant than partisan differences in what media people use. This mix of the established traditions and dynamics of the British media, and rapid change driven by the preferences of a younger generation and the possibilities offered by technology companies, provides the arena in which the general election campaign of 2017 will play out.

He has written extensively about political campaigns, news media, and digital communication, including his award-winning book Ground Wars: Personalized Communication in Political Campaigns.

How social media is reshaping news

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