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A report on eyes on the prize a documentary movie

Brown and Hamil R. John Lewis remembers the heads cracking, the horses trampling, the faces of state troopers.

They told the civil rights marchers they had three minutes to clear the bridge. A minute and a half later, they began beating the marchers with bullwhips and nightsticks that day in 1965 on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma. Many people may never see "Eyes on the Prize" because of copyright issues with photos used in the film, such as this one of the March on Washington.

Library Of Congress The Georgia congressman remembers the freedom rides, the sit-ins, the coffee poured on his head as he looked straight ahead, not fighting back. Remembers the firebombing of the houses of those who tried to register to vote.

The lynchings, strange fruit, people hanging from trees. The for-colored-only signs, the cigarettes put out on his head, the spit dribbling down his face as white boys told the "colored" protesters to get out.

Landmark Documentary 'Eyes on the Prize' Reframed the Civil Rights Movement

Remembers his parents telling him that was just the way it was. Many of these images of the black freedom struggle were captured in the award-winning 1987 documentary series "Eyes on the Prize," which portrayed the civil rights movement and the heroic efforts of Martin Luther King Jr.

  1. Next About This Episode "This is a racial incident... Remembers the firebombing of the houses of those who tried to register to vote.
  2. Many of these images of the black freedom struggle were captured in the award-winning 1987 documentary series "Eyes on the Prize," which portrayed the civil rights movement and the heroic efforts of Martin Luther King Jr.
  3. A growing and frustrated crowd quickly turns hostile, eventually looting and burning the city.
  4. When the Kerner Commission report is published in March 1968, it describes America as two societies, black and white, separate and unequal, and recommends new government programs to break down racial barriers and increase opportunity. Rooted for 75 years in the labor, civil rights and Black Power movements, she challenges a new generation to throw off old assumptions, think creatively and redefine revolution for our times.
  5. Following the riot, President Johnson appoints a commission to investigate its causes. Many of the rights in the eight-part sequel, "Eyes on the Prize II.

What scares Lewis now is that a new generation of people who know little or nothing about what it took for black people to get this far in this country -- with rights to vote, rights to attend the same schools as whites, rights to live in the same neighborhoods, ride the same trains, buses, work in the same places -- may not be able to see the film.

Yes, there are books and photographs about the struggle.

About This Episode

But those alone can't tell the story the way "Eyes on the Prize" did, Lewis says. The series is no longer available in stores and can't be shown on television or released on DVD until the filmmakers are able to renew the expired rights to footage, photos and music that were used.

  1. Federal assistance arrives in the form of 4,700 U.
  2. A 30-minute special feature, 'Eyes on the Prize.
  3. Many of these images of the black freedom struggle were captured in the award-winning 1987 documentary series "Eyes on the Prize," which portrayed the civil rights movement and the heroic efforts of Martin Luther King Jr.
  4. There is no central place to find out who owns what. Library Of Congress The Georgia congressman remembers the freedom rides, the sit-ins, the coffee poured on his head as he looked straight ahead, not fighting back.
  5. Some of the footage in "Eyes" was cleared for only five years, and the executive producer died before renewing the rights. Rooted for 75 years in the labor, civil rights and Black Power movements, she challenges a new generation to throw off old assumptions, think creatively and redefine revolution for our times.

The film is hampered by the same problem many documentary filmmakers are encountering as they wrestle with buying and renewing licenses to use copyrighted archival footage, photos and music. Independent filmmakers must pay for each piece of copyrighted material, and those costs have escalated in the past 10 years.

Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954-1965

Some of the footage in "Eyes" was cleared for only five years, and the executive producer died before renewing the rights. The first six parts aired in 1987. It was last broadcast on PBS in 1994. Many of the rights in the eight-part sequel, "Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965-1985 ," expired five years after it aired in 1990.

Eyes on the Prize: Two Societies (1965-1968)

Department of Human Services. The report, which recommends finding ways to lower costs for obtaining rights, says current interpretations of copyright law "leads to a creative stranglehold. There is no central place to find out who owns what.

There is no rule of thumb for pricing. No one has to agree to license.

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And it doesn't matter if you didn't intend to quote it. Did somebody sing 'Happy Birthday' in your documentary? Too bad -- you owe Time Warner a small fortune.