Essays academic service


A review of the archetype the prostitute with a heart of gold

Megan Fox plays Lilah, an archetypal soiled dove, in Jonah Hex. Alexandra from Bunraku fits this trope to a tee, as a kind-hearted middle-aged prostitute who realizes she is past her prime and will never have the happy and romantic life she desires. After a young Japanese woman is kidnapped by Alexandra's lover, Alexandra ends up sacrificing her life to save her. Especially in the lawless world below the Net, she is a rare example of a truly good person in the series. Sofia Semenovna Marmeladova from Dostoevsky 's Crime and Punishmentwho comes complete with a really heartbreaking story to justify her prostitution and ends up as a love interest as well as a sort of spiritual guide to the murderer Raskolnikoff, taking his confession of his sins and guiding him to the beginning of a "New Life.

It's only implied in the original, but in the foreword to a later edition, Dickens confirmed that she was in fact a prostitute. Emily's best friend Martha from David Copperfield is explicitely said to be this.

Hooker with a Heart of Gold

The people of Yarmouth except for the Peggotty family hated her to death because of this, so Emily helped her to leave for London so she won't carry the stigma anymore. Turns out she is the male Manipulative Bastard Shui Ta, too.

Traditionally, Mary Magdalene, friend of Jesus has been depicted as a harlot, but this comes from tradition and not from scripture. There is a scriptural example in the Old Testament, with Rahab see Joshua 2helping two Israelite spies escape Jericho. She even ends up as one of Jesus's ancestors. The Book of Hosea is a subversion. The prophet Hosea was told by God to marry the harlot Gomer no, not that Gomer as a metaphor for God's relationship with Israel.

She wouldn't give up her whoring ways, her possibly illegitimate children ended up with depressing names referring to how God felt about Israel, and Hosea had to buy her back. This is a character type that shows up in a lot of Christian fiction. Can be done extremely well a la Francine Rivers or not. Grushenka from The Brothers Karamazov is depicted as this for most of the book. It doesn't help that her beauty is such that a man can't really take his eyes off her. But later on, we learn that she's a nice person at heart, not the manipulative slut we'd imagined.

Some people would be disappointed by that.

Reet, Carrot's acquaintance in the Discworld novel Guards! Of course our innocent Chaste Hero never does work out what she does for a living because she gives her profession as "seamstress". Rosie Palm is shown as a regular seamstress in Night Watch and is depicted as a hard-as-nails woman who isn't exactly too sympathetic to "Keel's" plight.

This partially stems from "Keel's" temporal confusion, giving her the honorific 'Mrs. In later books when she is Mrs. Palm, and the chairwoman of the Seamstresses' Guildshe's consistently shown as the most sympathetic of the guild leaders.

The SoLid DoVEs in Monstrous Regiment are an aversion, as Polly expects the prostitutes to be this when they're exhausted, abrasive and take advantage of drunks. Esmenet, one of the main characters of Second Apocalypseis like this. Neither the book nor the world-famous musical takes her occupation lightly: The book is still more detailed about it, but then again, the book details everything.

Stripteaseby Carl Hiaasenhinges on this trope: Erin Grant becomes a stripper, but only because she has to do something lucrative to pay off her legal fees from trying to get custody of her daughter from her sleazeball ex-husband.

She never actually has much of a romance with anybody, let alone being saved by The Power of Loveand she gets the happiest ending of anyone in the book. Hooker with a heart of steel, indeed. Mona, in Gibson's Sprawl Trilogyplays the trope completely straight. Angelica Bianca in the Restoration-era comedy The Rover. Angelica was first portrayed by Nell Gwynn, who was a real-life example, going on to become the mistress of Charles II and become his Famous Last Words.

Prostitution is thought of as a fairly prestigious business in many works by Robert A.

  • The people of Yarmouth except for the Peggotty family hated her to death because of this, so Emily helped her to leave for London so she won't carry the stigma anymore;
  • The Castle episode "Love Me Dead" has a character who seems to be a textbook example.

A skilled Hetaera is usually a very perceptive and emotionally soothing person. The ones noted by name are especially so. Mercedes Lackey 's Free Bards 1: Arguably justified in that Madam Amber is extremely careful about who she hires. Two of them in Cloud of Sparrows. Marianne married Stark in a Flash Backand his Character Arc is about seeking revenge for her murder. Heiko is a geisha and assassin sent to kill Genji if he ever proves troublesome, but she later decides to let him live. Miss Audrey in the Liaden Universe.

She's a Space Soiled Dove and is one of the most moral and smart people around in her area. Heck, she even runs a school. In Theories Of Relativitythe 13-year-old girl who is the main character sets his eye on slowly becomes more and more hooker like.

As the story progresses, he suspects more and more that she has sexual experiences. All the while, they still stay friends and she makes some stupid decisions which hurt the protagonist.

At the end, the protagonist just loses hope on her. Although it's rare, she does show some emotion toward a select few people, and she becomes a love interest for Case. Pam, from the Tom Clancy book, Without Remorsekind of. Things go downhill once she leaves her 'handler', though.

From the Web

Lorena from Lonesome Dove is a prime example. Vita from And Eternity. Despite having written such a heavy subversion, John Steinbeck loved this trope, and put it to use elsewhere in East of Edenas well as Cannery Row and its sequel Sweet Thursday.

An unusual version of the trope as Jude Keller is male. The Shadowleague books give us Rochalla, who is only a prostitute because she needs to buy medicine for her younger brothers and sisters, all of whom are dying of the plague. Of course, it tends to end badly for the poor girl. Generally speaking, Balzac likes his Good Bad Girls. This is double subverted in Got, a crime novel by an anonymous author who goes by the letter D.

The protagonist has had several paid experiences with the prostitute in question, and strongly respects her even though he is aware she does not love him. Then he happens to bring a Briefcase Full of Money to their latest tryst, on his way to deliver it to a crime boss, and of course she can't resist the temptation to steal it.

The double subversion comes in that she's not the villain here--she's a reasonably decent person doing everything she can to escape her hellish life, and she's not nearly as evil as the aforementioned crime boss, who wants her dead and that money back no matter what the consequences. Xaviera Hollander described herself as this in her autobiography The Happy Hooker.

In the film version, this was sanitized by making the character a "hostess" at a nightclub.

  • The character KC Koloski on China Beach might at times seem to be a subversion or aversion of this trope, but with the way she constantly helps the others even when she seemingly doesn't want to, she does it anyhow , she's actually an embodiment of it;
  • Heiko is a geisha and assassin sent to kill Genji if he ever proves troublesome, but she later decides to let him live;
  • Belle Watling, the madam with a heart of gold, in Gone with the Wind , who always has clear moral insight, strangely enough, and donates generously to the cause;
  • This partially stems from "Keel's" temporal confusion, giving her the honorific 'Mrs.

Belle Watling, the madam with a heart of gold, in Gone with the Windwho always has clear moral insight, strangely enough, and donates generously to the cause. Other characters of this type named Belle are probably allusions to her. The authorized sequel Rhett Butler's People makes her even more sympathetic by revealing that she fell in love with Rhett and had his child.

Lula from the Stephanie Plum novels. When she first meets Stephanie, she is, indeed, a ho'; after she's maimed lightly and tied up on Stephanie's fire escape, she opts to leave the sexing life to become a bounty hunter herself.

She routinely brings up "back when I was a ho'" as it relates to the current situation.

  1. Xaviera Hollander described herself as this in her autobiography The Happy Hooker. She's three blocks away in front of the donut shop.
  2. An episode of NCIS featured a killer who was going after the clients of a prostitute.
  3. Heiko is a geisha and assassin sent to kill Genji if he ever proves troublesome, but she later decides to let him live.
  4. Later episodes show her hanging out with the Galactica's medical staff, and the Novelization of the pilot suggested she retrained as a Nurse, that being more useful than her old profession, which had some first aid knowledge. Vita from And Eternity.
  5. Lula from the Stephanie Plum novels...

She has kind of a stereotypical "sassy black woman" attitude about her that would conflict less with the trope if she were smarter in general. She's incredibly gung-ho about the idea of being a bounty hunter, but, as a consequence of aforementioned not-that-brightness, she has a tendency to make things worse.

It is played straight with one licensed companion in Purity In Death, but it is made clear that she is still young, shiny, and innocent. Then you have Charles Monroe, who is a male licensed companion who eventually left the profession to become a sex therapist. Some of the prostitutes are portrayed as between good and bad, and some of them are Complete Monsters.

Interestingly, a number of them have gotten killed off in the series. Some cases can be considered Karmawhile other cases can be considered a testament to the dangers of being a prostitute. She's been in love with the main character since before the story began, is sweet, helpful, honest, and is portrayed as a victim swept up in the Anti-Hero 's rampage of murder and crime, all the while remaining dogmatically optimistic about her lot in life and determined to overcome it.

Oh, and did I mention she's a prostitute? Corbie in Doctrine of Labyrinths is a prostitute when Felix Harrowgate meets her. She helps him find a cheap hotel, helps him learn a strange city. Trope is very common in novels which deal with adventurous characters, where most prostitutes are treated with uncanny sympathy. James Clavell's Asian Saga springs to mind. Part justified as the usual enviroment where the characters live sailors, adventurer merchants, military men on and around the battlefield has few opportunities to allow people make friends and build relationships outside - if Character X's nearest woman in many miles is a hooker, after some time they will become good friends, for sheer necessity if anything.

The prostitute Boule de Suif in Guy de Maupassant 's "Boule de Suif" refuses to sleep with a Prussian officer out of patriotism, but her rich and snobbish traveling companions who constantly insult her even though she shared food with them! She is pretty much the only moral non-hypocritical character in the story. She wanted to be an actress, but a review of the archetype the prostitute with a heart of gold only get not-real-acting jobs like stripogram or in her second appearance magician's assistant.

In a similar vein there was Cassiopeia on the original Battlestar Galactica Classic. She may have been called a "Socialator" in the pilot due to Executive Meddlingbut we all knew what that meant. Later episodes show her hanging out with the Galactica's medical staff, and the Novelization of the pilot suggested she retrained as a Nurse, that being more useful than her old profession, which had some first aid knowledge. The 2003 re-imagining subverted this one in "Black Market," in which Lee Adama has been travelling to another ship to see a prostitute and her daughter.

It looks like this trope, until it's revealed she was spying on him for a crime boss.

She thinks it's important enough to tell him this immediately, before her daughter is definitely safe and sound. Laurie, Sam's friend on The West Wing.