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A review of the hours by michael cunningham

  • Virginia, whose choice to write the powerful novel Mrs;
  • His prose acknowledges our search for answers, for direction—the right amount of happiness, the right way to raise a child, the right life to settle into;
  • She decides, with misgivings, that she is finished for today;
  • You end up just sailing from port to port.

She long ago embraced the art of reading multiple books in a variety of genres at once, and is always eager to talk about them. You can find her at swoodswords.

  • Clarissa is disappointed but relieved to find her life is her own and that she wants no other;
  • And anyway, she is no tragic protagonist, but a woman, like Woolf's Clarissa Dalloway, "destined to charm, to prosper";
  • This, she reminds herself, is a virtue;
  • From such a perspective, Woolf's Mrs;
  • She tells Laura, somewhat evasively, that the problem is in her uterus, probably the cause of her infertility;
  • Unless you'd like something fancier.

My own copy of The Hours is underlined and annotated with passages that I come back to year after year. Michael Cunningham won the Pulitzer Prize for this triptych, which is at once an homage to Mrs. Dalloway and a triple portrait of three women in three different time periods struggling for meaning in their own lives.

  1. This work in progress still has her provisional title, "The Hours", which Cunningham has duly taken for his own book.
  2. Yet the novel has two other narrative threads. She tells Laura, somewhat evasively, that the problem is in her uterus, probably the cause of her infertility.
  3. She realises her husband's happiness "depends only on the fact of her, here in the house, living her life, thinking of him".
  4. Clarissa Vaughan realizes without that holiday and the house where she, Richard and Louis spent it, so many events would not have occurred, including this moment now, standing in a kitchen cutting flowers for her best friend, Richard's, party.
  5. When I was doing research on Virginia Woolf, before reading Mrs.

Similarly, we intimately meet two other women at varying stages of life. The activities of the three women are examined so simply that we can see the act for what it is, the meanings that emerge when we add our thoughts to a moment and watch it suddenly become something else entirely.

Life is bigger than us, and yet we repeatedly try to fit ourselves into it.

  • She thinks of kissing Richard, a dramatic reversal of the kiss Woolf's Clarissa Dalloway shares with a girl when she was young;
  • Though he would have preferred a Rolls Royce, he landed on a Mercedes;
  • She does not want to get up despite it being her husband Dan's birthday;
  • The trick will be to render intact the magnitude of Clarissa's miniature but very real desperation; to fully convince the reader that, for her, domestic defeats are every bit as devastating as are lost battles to a general.

A master of his craft, Cunningham casts his characters in light and shadow, exposing raw emotions and hardened questions, communal experiences and expansive thoughts often left unspoken. His prose acknowledges our search for answers, for direction—the right amount of happiness, the right way to raise a child, the right life to settle into.

  1. Life is bigger than us, and yet we repeatedly try to fit ourselves into it. Cunningham's two earlier novels, ''A Home at the End of the World'' and ''Flesh and Blood,'' are remarkable for the intensity with which their characters experience their own strangeness -- as if to be ordinary were an accomplishment, only rarely within reach.
  2. I thought with remorse of the lost pages of reading the party had already cost me.
  3. She seems to associate Richard's apartment building with sense of decay and death.

His characters put deeper thoughts about friendship and motherhood, loving and dying into better words than we could ever hope to phrase for ourselves. The women balance each other, looking at the same world with different degrees of fervor—Clarissa, loving life with all its flaws, examining the way we fight so desperately to live, love, and thrive.

Virginia, whose choice to write the powerful novel Mrs. Dalloway and then end her own life, brings a contradictory color to her sections, mirroring the range of emotions all three women grapple with.

As the title suggests, time is a constant theme, a subject that can be debated and analyzed and spun a thousand different ways and still beg further investigation. Unraveling time in the context of death makes way for commentaries on debilitating sicknesses and their lasting effects, diseases of mind and body, and of pride, deceit, and fear. Dalloway is the object that connects them all; Woolf contemplates Mrs.

A reflection of how easy it is to lose ourselves to expectations, to other fictional worlds and ideas; what we look like as ourselves, and what we look like next to one another.

Roles portrayed in isolation, in groups, against responsibility, tragedy, and love—all different versions of ourselves. The hours you spend reading this book will merge with the hours still standing before you, empty yet full.