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An introduction to the literature by daphne du maurier

Upgrade skills and keep learning to prepare for the future Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.

An analysis of the book rebecca by daphne du maurier

But Du Maurier was so much more than Rebecca, the best-seller that shaped her career and has never gone out of print. Over the course of more than 40 books, she hopped genres, veering from Gothic suspense novels to deeply researched historical fiction, then switching to biting, macabre short stories and even biographies. And yet, try as she might, she was typecast as an easily readable romance novelist during her lifetime.

But the critical acclaim did not come easily. In recent years, though, Du Maurier has slowly been getting her due, even as her books continue to be TV and movie fodder.

Daphne du Maurier - An Introduction

My Cousin Rachel 1951 is one of her most complex and layered novels. It is really about money, and the unfairness of a Victorian world where women could not get it, except by trading on their fleeting, fading looks.

  • She lived at Menabilly, the Rashleigh owned manor house just outside Fowey, for about 25 years and wrote many of her books in a writing-hut in the grounds with a view over The Gribbin pictured above;
  • She is read and studied by students at school and university but also by men and women, of all ages, who just enjoy the pleasure of reading her works;
  • In this, she was way ahead of her time;
  • Interest in her is worldwide.

Is Rachel a hapless victim or a scheming gold digger? But there was more to her than being a fantastic storyteller. Du Maurier was also one of the early pioneers of championing satisfying work as an enduring source of joy for women.

Daphne Du Maurier, no longer a guilty read

She had three children, but writing always came first, according to many accounts. In this, she was way ahead of her time. In The Parasites 1949one of her early and little-known works, the heroine Maria works in the theatre.

  1. Suspense builds as narrator grows increasingly obsessed with the beautiful first wife and curious about the circumstances surrounding her death. In recent years, though, Du Maurier has slowly been getting her due, even as her books continue to be TV and movie fodder.
  2. In a later novel, Du Maurier explained domestic tedium in a single, scathing sentence. Du Maurier was also a fine historical writer, but never got the praise she deserved.
  3. She lived at Menabilly, the Rashleigh owned manor house just outside Fowey, for about 25 years and wrote many of her books in a writing-hut in the grounds with a view over The Gribbin pictured above. Often considered a mid-brow, romantic gothic novel , this highly successful work surprises the reader with its depth of understanding of the psychology of the mind, as well as its ability to haunt.
  4. There are distinct echoes of her femme fatales, especially Rebecca, in the recent crop of domestic thrillers, such as Gone Girl. But Du Maurier was so much more than Rebecca, the best-seller that shaped her career and has never gone out of print.

After her marriage collapses and her children leave, she returns to it. In a later novel, Du Maurier explained domestic tedium in a single, scathing sentence.

An analysis of the book rebecca by daphne du maurier

Dissatisfied, resentful men chafing at suffocating marriages. In reality, she was anything but. Some of this ability to see both sides of the coin may have been due to her complicated family relationships. She was the adored tomboyish daughter of Gerald du Maurier, a famous actor of his time, who nevertheless made no secret of his desire for a son. Many biographers have argued that Du Maurier was bisexual, and certainly her novels often seem oddly male and female simultaneously.

Du Maurier was also a fine historical writer, but never got the praise she deserved. One of her ancestors was a French glass-blower, who fled to England during the French Revolution. The house appeared in several of her other novels too. Perhaps Du Maurier was most uninhibited in her macabre short stories, which often were dystopic, supernatural, or just plain horrifying.

Introduction: Daphne Du Maurier [Editorial]

Her best-known story was The Birds. Its portrayal of a complete environmental collapse—with crazed birds attacking humankind—is supremely relevant today. The Alfred Hitchcock film, which Du Maurier hated, never matched the horror of the story.

In The Blue Lenses, a henpecked woman awakens from eye surgery to find her husband is a predator, using her for her money.

  • A shy, awkward young woman, she adores her wealthy, brooding husband, Maxim, with whom she lives at Manderley;
  • Articles such as this one were acquired and published with the primary aim of expanding the information on Britannica;
  • Suspense builds as narrator grows increasingly obsessed with the beautiful first wife and curious about the circumstances surrounding her death;
  • In this, she was way ahead of her time.

All her stories hint at inexorable forces massing against man, which makes them as modern today as when they were written. Current writers who dabble in the supernatural, like Sarah Waters and Stephen King, talk about how they were influenced by Du Maurier. There are distinct echoes of her femme fatales, especially Rebecca, in the recent crop of domestic thrillers, such as Gone Girl. Suspense at its finest The Glass - Blowers: Macabre stories, all with a twist in the tale The Scapegoat: A stylish exploration of a male midlife crisis The Parasites: Semi-autobiographical novel of a theatre family First Published: Fri, May 19 2017.