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Chapter 1 and 2 the last lecture

The Last Lecture Chapters 1-3 Summary & Analysis

Before speaking, Pausch received a long standing ovation from a large crowd of over 400 colleagues and students. When he motioned them to sit down, saying, "Make me earn it", someone in the audience shouted back, "You did!

At one point, to prove his own vitality, Pausch dropped down and did push-ups on stage.

  • In a hospital waiting room, he realizes what sets him apart from others is that he has fulfilled nearly all of his childhood dreams and goals;
  • He has been taught by many extraordinary teachers and mentors, and his forty-six-year journey is something he is passionate enough about that he can create an interesting lecture;
  • He is one of 37,000 Americans who are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer every year, so his cancer does not make him special in any way.

Pausch begins by setting up the various topics being discussed. The first of three subjects, his childhood dreams, is introduced by relaying the overall premise of why he is stating his dreams, saying, "inspiration and permission to dream are huge".

The Last Lecture Quotes

In this section, Pausch discusses his creation of the course "Building Virtual Worlds" that involves the student development of virtual realities. Through this course, Pausch creates a program called "Alice- The Infinitely Scalable Dream Factory" because he wants tens of millions of people to chase their dreams.

  • Pausch begins by setting up the various topics being discussed;
  • It includes stories of his childhood, lessons he wants his children to learn, and things he wants his children to know about him;
  • Arguably the most meaningful point Pausch made comes at the very end of his lecture, when he states;
  • Pausch is determined to make this speech not about how he is dealing with dying but about living;
  • He has been taught by many extraordinary teachers and mentors, and his forty-six-year journey is something he is passionate enough about that he can create an interesting lecture;
  • It became a New York Times bestseller in 2008, and remained on the list for 112 weeks, continuing into the summer of 2011.

This software allows kids to make movies and games, giving them the opportunity to learn something hard while still having fun. He believes that "the best way to teach somebody something is to have them think that they're learning something else. Pausch reiterates and introduces a few new lessons that he has learned and accumulated over his lifetime. Arguably the most meaningful point Pausch made comes at the very end of his lecture, when he states: If you lead your life the right way, the karma will take care of itself, the dreams will come to you.

It includes stories of his childhood, lessons he wants his children to learn, and things he wants his children to know about him. He repeatedly stresses that one should have fun in everything one does, and that one should live life to its fullest because one never knows when it might be taken.

In the book, Pausch remarks that people told him he looked like he was in perfect health, even though he was dying of cancer. He discusses finding a happy medium between denial and being overwhelmed.

Chapter 1 Summary

He also states that he would rather have cancer than be hit by a bus, because if he were hit by a bus, he would not have had the time he spent with his family nor the opportunity to prepare them for his death. The 2012 edition of the book features a short foreword written by Jai, his widow, reflecting on the time since her husband's death.

  1. The 2012 edition of the book features a short foreword written by Jai, his widow, reflecting on the time since her husband's death.
  2. Pausch begins by setting up the various topics being discussed.
  3. In this section, Pausch discusses his creation of the course "Building Virtual Worlds" that involves the student development of virtual realities.
  4. He and his wife, Jai, think he should be spending all his final days with his family. This software allows kids to make movies and games, giving them the opportunity to learn something hard while still having fun.

Reception[ edit ] The Last Lecture achieved commercial success. It became a New York Times bestseller in 2008, and remained on the list for 112 weeks, continuing into the summer of 2011. There was also speculation that the book would be turned into a movie, which was personally turned down by Pausch.

He commented that "there's a reason to do the book, but if it's telling the story of the lecture in the medium of film, we already have that", in a reference to the video of the lecture.