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Dr mehnaz afridi and her stories on the history of the holocaust

She is in a category by herself. Her own self-description reads: That is anathema to Dr. Afridi, who without any patronage has carved her own unique path in the intricate labyrinth of academia, interfaith engagement, and public discourse. A practicing Muslim who looks forward to her fasts for a month each year at Ramadan, Dr.

Afridi has remained true to her principles and her faith all the while having to navigate some treacherous turns and twists in her relationship to both the Muslim and Jewish communities.

  • Afridi, who without any patronage has carved her own unique path in the intricate labyrinth of academia, interfaith engagement, and public discourse;
  • On a rocky hill in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, students at Manhattan College bustle between classes on a campus dotted with trees cloaked in fiery shades of orange, red and yellow;
  • Preparations are underway for a Spring, 2016 conference during which twelve scholars Jews, Christians and Muslims will examine this topic;
  • Then, in 1995, Afridi won a Hebrew University grant to study biblical archaeology in Jerusalem;
  • Her introduction to and fascination with interfaith dialogue may have been sparked during those years;
  • In the world of terrorism and extremism, the image of Jewish, Christian, and Muslim relations has been portrayed as volatile and irreconcilable.

One can understand how Dr. Afridi might cause controversy in the Muslim world.

  1. Afridi, who without any patronage has carved her own unique path in the intricate labyrinth of academia, interfaith engagement, and public discourse. On a rocky hill in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, students at Manhattan College bustle between classes on a campus dotted with trees cloaked in fiery shades of orange, red and yellow.
  2. Not yet sure of her final path, she was accepted for a doctoral program in Islam and religious studies at the University of South Africa, going on to become a visiting professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. Dr mehnaz afridi is assistant religion, and the holocaust in her lecture, dr afridi will discuss her redefining antisemitism through the stories of jews.
  3. Freedman, religion columnist for The New York Times.
  4. Manhattan college celebrates expansion of the holocaust comment.

Her academic research documents a historical strain of anti-Semitism in Islam, further fueled in modern times by the conflict in the Middle East regarding Palestinian rights and Israeli sovereignty. She has duly and publicly noted that the anti-Semitism of the past seems to have morphed into present-day anti-Zionist and anti-Israel sentiment. Mehnaz Afridi discusses the role of Muslims in the Holocaust. Aside from stirring the pot in the Muslim community, Dr.

In time the critics calmed down because they had a chance to meet Dr.

Dr mehnaz afridi and her stories on the history of the holocaust

Afridi in person, establish a relationship with her, and eventually they came to value her and regard her as a person who was truly open to respectful Jewish-Muslim dialogue.

A warm and personable woman, with a hint of shyness, popular with her students and greatly respected by her interfaith colleagues, Dr.

Mehnaz Afridi Trains Muslim Eyes on the Holocaust

Afridi does not seek controversy. But neither does she hide from it. The daughter of Pakistani Muslims, a mostly secular banker and a more devout mother, Dr. Afridi developed her multicultural perspective from having lived in Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates, England, and Switzerland — all before she arrived in the U.

Muslims and the Holocaust: Reconciliation and Hope

As a child growing up in Switzerland, she experienced racism because of her color, religion and nationality. Her introduction to and fascination with interfaith dialogue may have been sparked during those years. She recalls being roughed up by members of her own soccer team — who would trip her intentionally — and hearing insults hurled against her parents.

Afridi After high school, her religious studies at Syracuse University led her to a Jewish professor specializing in Holocaust literature. At his urging, she made a visit to Israel for five weeks.

  • Scott Dennis The camp was bare, with white pebbles in the square and an empty space that spoke of the horror that lay in the lives of the prisoners, and the terrifying howls of my baby echoed throughout time;
  • She is in a category by herself;
  • A practicing Muslim who looks forward to her fasts for a month each year at Ramadan, Dr;
  • They're not thinking or shouting that now -- after she has quickly established an enviable record of building harmony and collaboration across the New York interfaith community and well beyond;
  • Manhattan, a Lasallian Catholic College in the Riverdale section of the city, was founded in 1853;
  • Her articles have appeared in books such as:

Not yet sure of her final path, she was accepted for a doctoral program in Islam and religious studies at the University of South Africa, going on to become a visiting professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.

From 2003 to 2005 she conducted interviews of Holocaust survivors, perhaps another first, a Muslim interviewing Jewish survivors. In 2007, while still a doctoral student, Dr.

Dr mehnaz afridi and her stories on the history of the holocaust

Afridi was invited to Germany to deliver an official paper on anti-Semitism in Egyptian literature. But why did I want to visit Dachau?

  • The appointment of dr mehnaz afridi as the new director of manhattan college's holocaust jews have been persecuted many times throughout history and now;
  • Hatred of the Jews in the 21st Century;
  • On Wednesday, Janet Pfeffer Vignola and "Salt of the Earth," will share the experiences of three families before, during and after the Holocaust.

Perhaps I wanted to be a witness, a Muslim witness, who could testify against the outrage of Holocaust denial in the Islamic world and point out the deep danger in ignoring history and the memory of narrative… Her baby daughter, who rarely cried, began to shriek.

Mehnaz and her daughter Ruya — Photo: Scott Dennis The camp was bare, with white pebbles in the square and an empty space that spoke of the horror that lay in the lives of the prisoners, and the terrifying howls of my baby echoed throughout time.

One Muslim Professor's Unusual Calling: Combating Holocaust Denial

At that moment, I felt as if I were a witness giving testimony to all Muslims. As someone who has witnessed numerous Holocaust deniers and anti-Semites, I found myself standing alone in the courtyard of Dachau, watching my daughter's eyes become blinded by the white stones of the camp … telling her that this very act of remembering and sharing the atrocities with others is the only assurance that this will never happen again to anyone.

My baby daughter squinted at me through her wet lashes as I held her in silence. Afridi stepped forward on Capitol Hill in D. Perhaps in so doing she invited serious consequences, but she feels God is always protecting her. She is determined to break the silence, to squarely confront Holocaust denial so that Muslims and Jews might engage in meaningful dialogue where every subject is admissible and on the table.