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The countless problems of christianity during the feudal times

History of Christianity I: Ancient Christianities This introduces various aspects of Christianity during the first seven centuries of its existence. Considerable attention will also be given to the spread of Christianity along the fringes and outside the borders of the Roman Empire.

We will concentrate especially on the historical diversity of the early Christian tradition, in an effort to understand better its contemporary complexity. In the course of the term, students will read and write reflective essays on several primary sources, each selected to represent the historical and confessional diversity of Christian traditions, as well as to present certain basic problems from the history of Christianity.

Religion in the Middle Ages

Nevertheless, since there is practically no evidence of any Christian devotion to Mary prior to 150 CE or, for that matter, to any other figure besides Jesusas a practical matter the study focuses primarily on the period from the latter half of the second century to the first half of the fifth. By evaluating devotion to Mary within the broader context of the emergent Christian cult of the saints, one can see that it was a phenomenon of particular significance within this broader development in Christian piety.

Marian piety in fact took a great diversity of forms in ancient Christianity, and exploring these variations will be an important focus of this class. Winter 2015 REL 102: Religions of Near Eastern Origin This course provides students with a basic working knowledge of the various religious traditions of Near Eastern origin.

Although we will devote considerable attention to the three numerically largest Western traditions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we will also discuss, however briefly, various other related traditions that are also deserving of our attention, including several religious traditions that have now become extinct.

History of Christianity

Students will read numerous primary texts from each of these traditions, which will be discussed in smaller groups. Finally, students will write a reflective essay requiring them to process and synthesize several key concepts from these religious traditions.

History of Eastern Christianity I: From Constantine to the Fall of Constantinople This course covers the history of Eastern Christianity from the beginnings of the Christian Roman Empire under Constantine to the Fall of Constantinople in the 15th century. The course will focus on the eastern Mediterranean but will also cover the history of Christianity in medieval Asia and Africa and the missionary expansion of Christianity to the Slavic lands.

Students will learn to appreciate the diversity and importance of the Eastern Christian tradition, and will write papers on various topics using primary texts to investigate an issue central to understanding Eastern Christianity. Spring 2015 REL 325: History of Eastern Christianity II: From the Fall of Constantinople to the Fall of Communism This course covers the history of Eastern Christianity from the fall of Constantinople in the 15th century until the fall of European Communism in the late 20th.

The second half of the class will focus on the history of Christianity in Russia and, to a lesser extent, Eastern Europe.

  • The oldest Christian paintings are from the Roman Catacombs, dated to about 200, and the oldest Christian sculptures are from sarcophagi, dating to the beginning of the third century;
  • And this is not just a matter of numbers;
  • On the other hand, the Cistercians wore white robes and remained in remote areas to avoid distraction in their prayers;
  • Rome , Constantinople , Jerusalem , Antioch, and Alexandria;
  • Emperors considered themselves responsible to God for the spiritual health of their subjects, and thus they had a duty of maintain orthodoxy.

In the course of the term, students will write reflective essays on several primary sources, each selected to represent the historical diversity of the Christian traditions, as well as to present certain basic problems and issues from the history of Christianity. Other Courses REL 322: History of Christianity II: Christianity in the Medieval West This course introduced students the history of the Christian traditions in Western Europe during the middle ages, from ca.

We will focus especially on the development of Christian thought, the structures of the medieval church, and the interplay of church and politics. We will also concentrate on the historical diversity of the early Christian tradition, in an effort to understand better its contemporary complexity.

  • Matrimonial cases too were considered like matters relating to the legitimacy of children, recording of marriages, wills and personal property;
  • Ancient Christianities This introduces various aspects of Christianity during the first seven centuries of its existence;
  • The principal source of information for this period is the Acts of the Apostles , which gives a history of the Church from the Great Commission 1:

History of Christianity III: Modern Western Christianity This course will introduce students the history of the Western Christian traditions in Europe and America from 1500 to the present. We will focus especially on the development of Christian thought, the structures of the modern church, and the interplay of church, culture, and society.

We will also concentrate on the historical diversity of the Christian tradition, in an effort to understand better its contemporary complexity. Jenkins, The Next Christendom. And this is not just a matter of numbers: Due in large part to the preservation of the classical heritage of Greece and Rome, Asian Christian culture was far more sophisticated than the West in the areas of theology, philosophy, and literature, as well as science, math, and medicine.

Indeed, the well-known intellectual renaissance of medieval Islam under the Abbasids was largely facilitated by the learned Asian Christian scholars who served as important teachers and translators in this movement.

  1. The sources for the beliefs of the apostolic community include the Gospels and New Testament Epistles. His reforms attempted to create a form of religious heterogeneity by, among other things, reopening pagan temples, accepting Christian bishops previously exiled as heretics, promoting Judaism , and returning Church lands to their original owners.
  2. Early Christian writings As Christianity spread, its converts included members from well-educated circles of the Hellenistic world, some of whom became bishops. Christian view of the Law for the modern debate.
  3. It is the era in which the great cathedrals of Europe were built and the Catholic Church started its universities in Paris, Tubingen, Cambridge and Oxford. Ecumenical Councils During this era, several Ecumenical Councils were convened.
  4. Arianism held that Jesus, while not merely mortal, was not eternally divine and was, therefore, separate from God, the Father. Nor is it widely recognized that millions of Christians in southern India today belong to communities that were first established during the second century, if not even as early as the first century!
  5. Christianity in the Medieval West This course introduced students the history of the Christian traditions in Western Europe during the middle ages, from ca. As such methods have proven highly effective in probing behind the surface of traditional materials to illuminate the origins of Judaism and Christianity, so one imagines that similar perspectives hold great potential for investigating the beginnings of Islam, which has largely been shielded from this critical lens.

Perhaps even less well known is the fact that Christianity reached China by the early seventh century, leaving behind numerous original theological works written in Chinese during the seventh through ninth centuries.

Nor is it widely recognized that millions of Christians in southern India today belong to communities that were first established during the second century, if not even as early as the first century! Christianity also has a rich history in medieval Central Asia, where it was an important part of a complex religious landscape that included Buddhism, Islam, and Manichaeism, among other religious traditions.

A small remnant of this once great church still exists in the modern day Church of the East, most of whose members live in Iraq. This course aims to fill in this important gap in our knowledge of the Christian and human past.

The Historical Muhammad and Islam in the Seventh Century Countless college textbooks and biographies of Muhammad present the beginnings of the Islamic religious tradition as it were a relatively straightforward affair. Yet such confidence in these traditional accounts it largely unwarranted, and scholars of early Islam have long recognized that the earliest sources for the beginnings of Islam were arrestingly late in forming.

  1. Yet such confidence in these traditional accounts it largely unwarranted, and scholars of early Islam have long recognized that the earliest sources for the beginnings of Islam were arrestingly late in forming.
  2. Perhaps even less well known is the fact that Christianity reached China by the early seventh century, leaving behind numerous original theological works written in Chinese during the seventh through ninth centuries. Early Christianity 33 — 325 C.
  3. Lastly, deacons also performed certain duties, such as tending to the poor and sick. The prestige of these sees depended in part on their apostolic founders, from whom the bishops were thus considered spiritual successors, e.
  4. In accordance with the prevailing customs, Constantine was baptized on his deathbed. The course will focus on the eastern Mediterranean but will also cover the history of Christianity in medieval Asia and Africa and the missionary expansion of Christianity to the Slavic lands.
  5. This early rejection of images, although never proclaimed by theologians, leaves us with little archaeological records regarding early Christianity and its development.

Moreover, the traditional narratives of Islamic origins are widely acknowledged to present a highly stylized, even mythical account of Islamic origins that was fashioned to meet the needs and interests of the Islamic tradition as it had developed by its second and third centuries.

Accordingly, scholars of early Islam have often made an undesirable choice between either accepting the basic outlines of the traditional narrative of origins as in so many textbooks and biographies or resigning themselves to relative ignorance about the events of the first Islamic century. This course, however, pursues an alternative option, by following historical-critical approaches similar to those employed by scholars of biblical studies to illuminate the beginnings of Islam.

As such methods have proven highly effective in probing behind the surface of traditional materials to illuminate the origins of Judaism and Christianity, so one imagines that similar perspectives hold great potential for investigating the beginnings of Islam, which has largely been shielded from this critical lens. Then we will examine and critique the traditional narrative of Islamic origins given by the Islamic sources and re-presented by many western scholars.

As an alternative to this received narrative, we will the countless problems of christianity during the feudal times on several specific areas where historical-critical scholarship has met with some success in reconstructing the earliest history of Islam: In all of this the course will pay especially close attention to evidence provided by non-Islamic sources from the period, which all too often have been overlooked in the study of Islamic origins.

Gender, the Body, and Sexuality in Early Christianity The early Christians developed several highly sophisticated understandings of the body, each of which impacted and was impacted by certain constructions of gender and sexuality. The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the various notions of gender, the body, and sexuality found in the earliest Christian traditions.

We will focus on how and why certain Christian texts sought to normalize certain constructions of gender, the body, and sexuality, and how these three discourses were constructed in close relation to one another.

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  • They produced two sorts of works;
  • Post-Apostolic Church See also: