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The most important event in to kill a mockingbird a novel by harper lee

Scout enjoys her first snowfall and building her first snowman--"The Morphodite Snowman"--with Jem, but the day turns tragic when Miss Maudie's house burns down.

Scout also discovers that she has a new friend: Unnoticed, Boo Radley has placed a blanket upon Scout's shoulders to keep her warm. This chapter is important because it introduces Miss Maudie's explanation about it being a "sin to kill a mockingbird," and reveals to the children that ol' Atticus has a secret talent after all.

Jem is punished for destroying the irritable old Mrs.

Dubose's camellias by reading to her for a month. When the old lady dies shortly after Jem completes his punishment, Atticus reveals that she has been going cold turkey from a longtime morphine addiction.

She was the bravest person he ever knew, Atticus tells Jem. The children get a close-up and first-hand educational experience when they join Cal for services at the all-black First Purchase Church in the Quarters. Little did the children know that when they followed Atticus to the jail, they would end up saving Tom Robinson's life--and possibly Atticus's as well.

Scout's innocent engagement with Walter Cunningham Sr.

  1. More importantly, it helps Jem begin to associate being brave and gentlemanly with protecting the innocent.
  2. For the novel's fans, Atticus is a remarkable figure in American literature not because he transcends the segregationist mores of Maycomb but because he demands justice and tolerance within the framework of his own time. She originally conceived it as a novel focusing on main character Jean Louise "Scout" Finch as an adult returning to Maycomb for a summer visit and confronting the racial realities of her hometown in response to the civil rights movement; it was to be titled Go Set a Watchman.
  3. All three of the children--Jem, Scout and Dill--grow by leaps and bounds during the day of the Tom Robinson trial. After Sheriff Tate decides to call Bob's death self-inflicted, Scout takes Boo's arm and walks him back to the Radley Place, where she looks out over her neighborhood while standing in Boo's shoes and seeing thing's through Boo's eyes.
  4. Perhaps even more astounding, the novel is required reading in many schools in Ireland, Great Britain, Australia, and Canada, as well as in many non-English-speaking countries.

All three of the children--Jem, Scout and Dill--grow by leaps and bounds during the day of the Tom Robinson trial. They witness the ignorance of Mayella Ewell, the racist hatred of Bob Ewell, the innocent honesty of Tom Robinson, and the lawyering skills of Atticus Finch.

Despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the jury sides with the Ewells, convicting Tom of rape and battery. Jem is heartbroken--that Atticus has lost and that the people of Maycomb may not be quite as good as he had assumed. Scout learns that not all of the church-going "ladies" behave in a ladylike manner.

  • To Kill A Mockingbird has played a significant role in the intense half-century debate Americans have had about the role of education in fostering moral values;
  • The children get a close-up and first-hand educational experience when they join Cal for services at the all-black First Purchase Church in the Quarters;
  • At her father's law office where she wrote "Mockingbird," Miss Lee works on her next novel.

Atticus delivers some bad news during the meeting--Tom Robinson has been killed trying to escape from prison--and when Miss Maudie and Aunt Alexandra compose themselves and return to the business at hand, Scout decides she can act like a lady, too. Returning from the Halloween pageant, Jem and Scout are attacked by an unseen man--and then saved by another.

What are ten major events in To Kill a Mockingbird, and why are they important?

When the dust settles, Bob Ewell is found dead with a knife in his chest. The "malevolent phantom" Boo Radley finally appears, making Scout's fantasy come true. It is Boo that has stopped Bob's attack on Jem and Scout, killing the man who tried to harm Boo's children.

  • In March 1931, just before Harper turned 5 years old, a bold-headlines case gripped Alabama;
  • In 1991, the Library of Congress asked 5,000 patrons to name the book that had made the biggest difference in their lives;
  • Atticus and Jem are the first to realize it must have been Arthur Boo Radley who put the blanket around Scout's shoulders, without her noticing it, since Nathan Radley was helping out at the fire;
  • At her father's law office where she wrote "Mockingbird," Miss Lee works on her next novel;
  • Atticus delivers some bad news during the meeting--Tom Robinson has been killed trying to escape from prison--and when Miss Maudie and Aunt Alexandra compose themselves and return to the business at hand, Scout decides she can act like a lady, too;
  • Hence, the incident is significant because it helps Jem begin to understand the extant of Atticus's bravery and to associate bravery with being a gentleman.

After Sheriff Tate decides to call Bob's death self-inflicted, Scout takes Boo's arm and walks him back to the Radley Place, where she looks out over her neighborhood while standing in Boo's shoes and seeing thing's through Boo's eyes.