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The summary of the book of zephaniah the least known book of the bible

  • It touched me, so I would recommend it to anyone;
  • A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary;
  • And the angel that talked with me said unto me, I will shew thee what these be;
  • And I said, No, my lord.

Punishment and Conversion of the Nations 3: The great day of the Lord is near— near and coming quickly. The cry on the day of the Lord will be bitter, the shouting of the warrior there.

That day will be a day of wrath, a day of distress and anguish, a day of trouble and ruin, a day of darkness and gloom, a day of clouds and blackness, a day of trumpet and battle cry against the fortified cities and against the corner towers.

I will bring distress on the people and they will walk like blind men, because they have sinned against the Lord. Their blood will be poured out like dust and their entrails like filth Zephaniah 1: Though this notion was commensurate with the eschatological vision of later prophets, it was not itself eschatological, in that they events that it describes were not seen to represent the terminus ad quo of human history.

Instead, it represents the religious aspirations of a society that is utterly convinced of their deity's power and inclination to take a direct role in historical reality: In Christian theology this 'day' became the Last Judgment. For the prophets, however, the Day of Yahweh does not mean any exact forensic investigation; it is a day of war, on which God will come in a rushing theophany accompanied by cosmic phenomena, such as storm and lightning.

Zephaniah, Book of

In a flash he will finally consummate the auras evoked by the deeds of all sinners and evil doers i. Specifically, the book sees the beginnings of a more expansive theology, which situates Yahweh as the only God and the God who rules over all nations—an apparently unique belief in the ancient Middle East. In this cultural sphere, the demesnes a god were thought to begin and end with their respective tribe's borders, a belief that the Israelites flouted with their conviction that their god could act against Assyria, Edom, and other nations.

Woe to you who live by the sea, O Kerethite people; the word of the Lord is against you, O Canaan, land of the Philistines. Therefore, as surely as I live," declares the Lord Almighty, the God of Israel, "surely Moab will become like Sodom, the Ammonites like Gomorrah— a place of weeds and salt pits, a wasteland forever.

The remnant of my people will plunder them; the survivors of my nation will inherit their land" Zephaniah 2: Likewise, God's vengeance is described in terms that seem to reverse the creation account described in the Book of Genesis.

Similarities might be expected between these works because the Deuteronomistic history covers an overlapping period of time and because the issues that are dealt with in the book of Zephaniah namely the apostasy of the Israelites go straight to the heart of the covenant Mosaic and Deuteronomic covenants. In brief, the first 3-4 of the Ten Commandments contained in Exodus 20: It is this integral component of the covenant between Yahweh and Israel that is threatened by the practices that are bemoaned in the first chapter Zephaniah: I will stretch out my hand against Judah and against all who live in Jerusalem.

I will cut off from this place every remnant of Baal, the names of the pagan and the idolatrous priests- those who bow down on the roofs to worship the starry host, those who bow down and swear by the Lord and who also swear by Molech, those who turn back from following the Lord and neither seek the Lord nor inquire of him Zephaniah 1: In this manner, Zephaniah invokes one of the most common moral exhortations, not only in prophetic literature, but in the whole of the Hebrew Scriptures.

Where are we?

This suggests that the author of Zephaniah was familiar with and drew upon earlier Israelite religious tradition and also that later biblical writers regarded the book of Zephaniah as an authoritative or at least respectable work in the prophetic corpus. For this reason Sophonias [Zephaniah] might be regarded as the type of Hebrew Prophets and as the final example of the prophetic terminology. He does not seek the glory of an original writer, but borrows freely both ideas and style from the older Prophets especially Isaias [Isaiah] and Jeremias [Jeremiah] ….

  1. I will go also.
  2. He does not seek the glory of an original writer, but borrows freely both ideas and style from the older Prophets especially Isaias [Isaiah] and Jeremias [Jeremiah] ….
  3. For this reason Sophonias [Zephaniah] might be regarded as the type of Hebrew Prophets and as the final example of the prophetic terminology. Zephaniah wrote that the day of the Lord was near 1.
  4. Given her discomfiture with the original suggestion, Berlin is likewise unconvinced by the argument that the prophet's lineage includes Hezekiah as a means of off-setting the perceived "foreignness" of the text's author. That would put his ministry around 630 BCE.

The language of Sophonias is vigorous and earnest, as become the seriousness of the period, but is free from the gloomy elegiac tone of Jeremias. In some passages it becomes pathetic and poetic, without however attaining the classical diction or poetical flight of a Nahum or Deutero-Isaias. There is something solemn in the manner in which the Lord is so frequently introduced as the speaker, and the sentence of judgment falls on the silent earth i, 7.

Apart from the few plays on words cf. Abingdon Press, 1994-2004659. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. The Anchor Bible, Volume 25A. Doubleday, 199466-67.

  • That day will be a day of wrath, a day of distress and anguish, a day of trouble and ruin, a day of darkness and gloom, a day of clouds and blackness, a day of trumpet and battle cry against the fortified cities and against the corner towers;
  • And he said unto me, To measure Jerusalem, to see what is the breadth thereof, and what is the length thereof.

Given her discomfiture with the original suggestion, Berlin is likewise unconvinced by the argument that the prophet's lineage includes Hezekiah as a means of off-setting the perceived "foreignness" of the text's author. Oxford University Press, 2001604.