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Use of persuasive language in julius caesar

Shakespeare's tragedy charts the growing power of Julius Caesar in Ancient Rome and the part played by co-conspirators Brutus, Cassius and Antony in his downfall before the onset of civil war.

Julius Caesar and Shakespeare’s power to persuade

Explore the language of the play. Rhetoric There is a startling number of eloquent speeches in Julius Caesar.

A speech performed by an individual, often depicting that person thinking or talking aloud]. And in others a character persuades people over to their point of view, sometimes in a public speech. For example, look at Cassius's speeches to persuade Brutus in Act 1 Scene 2.

  1. The questions are worded in a way where the only logical answer makes Caesar looks bad, so when he plants these questions in Brutus' head, he gets him to reallys start thinking about the damage Caesar is causing Rome. Asking Rhetorical Questions - Cassius often asks Brutus questions that aren't meant to be answered.
  2. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
  3. You have so many rhetorical techniques to choose from. Reading it must always have been difficult.
  4. Emotional connection making them care , in that order.

There is also Brutus reflecting on his decision to kill Caesar, at the beginning of Act 2. Probably the most famous example is Antony's speech to the crowd after Caesar's death in Act Three Scene 2, which begins: Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

The evil that men do lives after them; What are the tricks that Antony uses to persuade the crowd that Caesar was wrongly killed?

Analyze the persuasive techniques Cassius uses in Act 1, Scene 2.

With his opening words he identifies himself with the crowd as their friend, fellow citizen and countryman. He accepts that Brutus has said Caesar is ambitious, but throughout the speech he turns this round with questions and talks about how Caesar was admired and generous.

He uses rhetorical questions to good effect. He effectively uses repetition. He repeatedly reminds the crowd that it was Brutus who led the killing and with such associations erodes the meaning of the word "honourable". He shows grief, with which the crowd can identify.

  • This is extremely effective because Brutus is left to think the citizens of Rome feel Caesar is detrimental to Rome;
  • Shakespeare's tragedy charts the growing power of Julius Caesar in Ancient Rome and the part played by co-conspirators Brutus, Cassius and Antony in his downfall before the onset of civil war;
  • And here is the trailer to the stage version, which includes Ray Fearon performing part of his great speech;
  • The evil that men do lives after them; What are the tricks that Antony uses to persuade the crowd that Caesar was wrongly killed?

He uses Caesar's will to tempt his audience, telling them how angry they would be if they heard how generous Caesar had been to them. He is leading them on until they think they are insisting he should read it to them against his judgement.

Related Questions

He influences their thinking with lines like "well-beloved Brutus stabb'd". He uses the moment of death to remind the crowd of Caesar's heroism by referring to the mantle Caesar wore in battle, which he was also wearing when he died.

  • Rhetoric There is a startling number of eloquent speeches in Julius Caesar;
  • He shows grief, with which the crowd can identify;
  • Emotional connection making them care , in that order;
  • Suddenly, the waves got rough and Caesar would have drown had Cassius not saved him Act 1, Scene 2, lines 102-113;
  • And in others a character persuades people over to their point of view, sometimes in a public speech;
  • The evil that men do lives after them; What are the tricks that Antony uses to persuade the crowd that Caesar was wrongly killed?

It is then horrifying when Antony details the rents made in the mantle by the conspirators' daggers. When Antony finally reveals the details of Caesar's will he promises the people money and Caesar's grounds as public property.