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What is pious in religion based on platos euthyphro

Is something good because it is approved, because it benefits someone, or because it has the intrinsic qualities of goodness?

Philosophy of Religion

Something is good because it is approved. Something is good because it benefits someone. Something is good because it is intrinsically good. Throughout Plato's critique and review of philosophical dilemmas, it often seems as though he speaks through the voice of Socrates' himself. A further example of Plato's thought experiments being verbalized by his muse, Socrates, is found in my analysis of Plato's Republic. What's important to realize is that the question of whether Socrates was a real character in history, or whether Socrates was a projection of Plato's mind bears little importance when analyzing Plato's overall work and thought experiments.

So, without further ado, let's begin. Next, I will explain the difference between "the gods loving the pious because it is pious" and "the pious being pious because the gods love it".

Finally, I will give my opinion as to what I think the pious can be explained as. Source The Form of Piety and Holiness: Eidos To begin, Socrates urges Euthyphro to examine his ideals of what piety or holiness are.

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Euthyphro concludes that what is holy is what all gods agree upon, and that which is not agreed upon is unholy. This, however, perplexes Socrates, because it seems that there are disputes among the gods as the what is deemed right or pious.

  1. Compare Theaetetus Both have legal business in hand. In this case, those who do not agree would be mistaken, since they would be rejecting the true form of holy; a form outside of the gods themselves.
  2. Socrates points out that this may also be a problem, because it is not the fact that whenever you do things that are holy, you are improving the gods in some way. He is still hoping that he will condescend to instruct him.
  3. Finally, I will give my opinion as to what I think the pious can be explained as. There seem to be altogether three aims or interests in this little Dialogue.
  4. Something is good because it benefits someone. These are the very tales which Socrates cannot abide; and his dislike of them, as he suspects, has branded him with the reputation of impiety.
  5. Eidos To begin, Socrates urges Euthyphro to examine his ideals of what piety or holiness are.

What Socrates wants to understand is the form of holy. The form of holy would have to be the same in all instances.

After, Euthyphro needs further explanation. Socrates explains the difference by stating that being approved is an example either of coming to be so or of being affected by something.

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So, if the gods unanimously agreed on one thing being holy, it would be holy because they say so, not because it is holy in form. On the other hand, there can be something that is holy, yet all of the gods might not agree upon it. In this case, those who do not agree would be mistaken, since they would be rejecting the true form of holy; a form outside of the gods themselves. Source Do the Gods Benefit from Piety?

  • This Euthyphro and Socrates are represented as meeting in the porch of the King Archon;
  • Eidos To begin, Socrates urges Euthyphro to examine his ideals of what piety or holiness are.

After some thought, Euthyphro comes up with a response to what Socrates has just posited. Euthyphro says that holiness is the part of justice which looks after the gods.

An Analysis of Piety in Plato

So, Socrates then makes the comparison and analogy of other services, such as shipbuilders achieving the creation of boats. This shows that services create a multitude of good things for those who partake in such endeavors.

Plato Euthyphro

Socrates points out that this may also be a problem, because it is not the fact that whenever you do things that are holy, you are improving the gods in some way.

Euthyphro sees this problem, and then chooses to say that while the gods get no benefit from our services, they do get gratification. When understanding gratification, Socrates suggests that explaining holiness in terms of gratification of the gods is similar to explaining it in terms of their approval. With this, Socrates must have chuckled, because we are now back to the statement that what is holy is what is approved by the gods.

  1. Socrates is defendant in a suit for impiety which Meletus has brought against him it is remarked by the way that he is not a likely man himself to have brought a suit against another ; and Euthyphro too is plaintiff in an action for murder, which he has brought against his own father. This Euthyphro and Socrates are represented as meeting in the porch of the King Archon.
  2. The latter has originated in the following manner. Socrates is attending the court having been indicted for corrupting the young with impiety.
  3. This shows that services create a multitude of good things for those who partake in such endeavors. So, it seems, knowledge of the form of holy is what remains most important.
  4. Socrates is attending the court having been indicted for corrupting the young with impiety.

In such an instance, Socrates would have merely had to suggest, as he did, that the gods quarrel and often times do not conclude the same rulings as each other. So, it seems, knowledge of the form of holy is what remains most important.

Form is not something that can be taken from or added to. If I were to debate in relational terms to the ancient greek gods, I would say that piety is a form outside of the gods, and that the gods recognize this form to be an unchanging truth that comes from outside themselves and thus accept it as such.

It is not something that comes about because of its approval, it is something that just is, and the approval can be something that can be said for it. God does not approve piety, for piety is this God.

Instead, humans say that God approves the piety, just as we say anything else. For, in human reality, all things appear separate, and we thus attribute things in relation to this appearance of separateness.

So, when we say that God approves pious actions, we are deceiving ourselves unless we truly mean that God is all pious actions that can come about. I say my arm, but I mean my body.

  • This is the origin of the charge of murder which Euthyphro brings against his father;
  • Thus begins the contrast between the religion of the letter, or of the narrow and unenlightened conscience, and the higher notion of religion which Socrates vainly endeavours to elicit from him;
  • Next, I will explain the difference between "the gods loving the pious because it is pious" and "the pious being pious because the gods love it";
  • Euthyphro answers that there is no difference of opinion, either among gods or men, as to the propriety of punishing a murderer;
  • But when we expect him to go on and show that the true service of the gods is the service of the spirit and the co-operation with them in all things true and good, he stops short; this was a lesson which the soothsayer could not have been made to understand, and which every one must learn for himself;
  • The spirit in which the popular representations of mythology are denounced recalls Republic II.

We considered the differences between gods creating the pious with their approval and the gods loving the pious because it is pious. Finally, we examined what the opposing arguments would have looked like had the opposing statement been made, along with my personal opinion on all matters of piety and other such matter as these.