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A report on the nurses role in vietnam

Published online 2017 Jan 15. Kabat Find articles by Daniel H. Abstract Relatively little has been written about the military women who served in Vietnam, and there is virtually no literature on deployed civilian women non-military.

We examined the experiences of 1285 American women, military and civilian, who served in Vietnam during the war and responded to a mail survey conducted approximately 25 years later in which they were asked to report and reflect upon their experiences and social and health histories.

We compare civilian women, primarily American Red Cross workers, to military women stratified by length of service, describe their demographic characteristics and warzone experiences including working conditions, exposure to casualties and sexual harassmentand their homecoming following Vietnam.

We assess current health and well-being and also compare the sample to age- and temporally-comparable women in the General Social Survey GSSwith which our survey shared some measures.

Additional differences regarding warzone experiences, homecoming support, and health outcomes were found among groups. Civilian women who served in Vietnam reported better health than women in the other groups. Regression analyses indicated that long-term physical health was mainly influenced by demographic characteristics, and that mental health and PTSD symptoms were influenced by warzone and homecoming experiences.

Overall, this paper provides insight into the experiences of the understudied women who served in Vietnam, and sheds light on subgroup differences within the sample. Introduction On Veterans Day, 1993, more than 25,000 women gathered on the Mall in Washington, DC, to witness the official dedication of a bronze statue honoring women's service in the Vietnam War. The statue was the culmination of an intense campaign for acknowledgement of the vital role played by women, both military and civilian, in that conflict.

  • The statue was the culmination of an intense campaign for acknowledgement of the vital role played by women, both military and civilian, in that conflict;
  • We also help contextualize some of the findings by comparing our sample on demographics of marriage and childbearing and on measures of happiness and well-being to a contemporaneous nationally representative age-matched cohort the General Social Survey, GSS.

This paper reports on a survey, carried out in collaboration with the VMWP, of 1285 women deployed to Vietnam for either military or civilian service, groups for whom information is sparse and largely consists of small-sample interviews and anecdotal evidence. These data flesh out the minimal information available on the deployed women of the Vietnam War. We also help contextualize some of the findings by comparing our sample on demographics of marriage and childbearing and on measures of happiness and well-being to a contemporaneous nationally representative age-matched cohort the General Social Survey, GSS.

About 265,000 women served in the U.

Women at war: The crucible of Vietnam

During the Vietnam era, military women were not formally assigned combat roles. Nonetheless, they were deployed to combat zones where they experienced warzone stressors and hostile fire. They handled many casualties, and some were themselves wounded or injured. The nurses functioned in life-and-death situations, were assigned profound medical responsibilities generally exceeding the authority they would have been afforded in civilian settings, and often performed duties that were beyond the scope of their professional training.

Navy Nurse Corps Vietnam duty was generally for 90 days on one of the two hospital ships in Vietnam waters.

  • Additional differences regarding warzone experiences, homecoming support, and health outcomes were found among groups;
  • Nonetheless, they were deployed to combat zones where they experienced warzone stressors and hostile fire.

Air Force nurses were not stationed in Vietnam, but could land in Vietnam multiple times in a single day to pick up wounded soldiers and accompany them to hospitals in Japan or elsewhere. ARC women make up the largest population of the civilians in this study. It is useful for the modern reader to recall some social context of the women deployed to Vietnam. Women deployed to Vietnam were expected to reflect the female gender as it was then conceptualized.

Feminine appearance was essential. Nurses arriving in Vietnam deplaned into the brutal heat and dirt of Vietnam wearing dress uniforms with nylon hose and dress shoes. They wore blue seersucker shirtwaist dresses or culottes throughout the War, even while flying in helicopters to set up recreational activities at fire support bases deep in the jungle, often under extremely dangerous circumstances Steinman, 2000 ; p.