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An examination and description of the african elephant

African elephants eat a wide variety of vegetation, including grass, herbs, shrubs, roots, fruit, and bark as well as foliage and twigs from trees.

  1. An adult elephant consumes about 100 kg of food and 100 litres 26 gallons of water per day; these amounts can double for a hungry and thirsty individual. He left Cartagena, Spain, in 218 bce with 37 elephants—36 African forest elephants and one Asian—each under its own well-trained mahout.
  2. At birth an elephant has two or three pairs of cheek teeth in each jaw.
  3. Males and females both possess two glands that open between the eye and ear. While standing, elephants doze for short periods but do not sleep deeply.
  4. An adult elephant consumes about 100 kg of food and 100 litres 26 gallons of water per day; these amounts can double for a hungry and thirsty individual.
  5. The trunk is large and powerful, weighing about 130 kg 290 pounds in an adult male and capable of lifting a load of about 250 kg.

The proportion of grass versus browse in the diet reflects their availability and their nutrient value and changes with season. While a wide variety of plant species may be included in the diet, often a relative few make up the bulk of the diet.

An examination and description of the african elephant

African elephants eat grass, foliage, bark and twigs from trees, herbs, shrubs, roots and fruit. B Foods eaten appears to vary seasonally: B Elephants may push trees over to access edible leaves and twigs; this can modify habitat over large areas.

B A study of the stomach contents of African elephants found that the average composition was: In the dry season when the grasses have dried up, they eat woods parts of trees and shrubs. Other food items include roots, and, when available, flowers and fruits. In the dry season the nutrient quality of grass is decreased, but that of leafy browse is higher, since many trees and shrubs flower and come into leaf at this time.

It was noted that the diet was low in protein from July to late September or early October when the grass flushes. Often woody vegetation was stripped of leaves without the stems being taken.

In the wet season the leaves and flowers are taken; in the dry season leaf bases and roots of tussock grasses are eaten. Combretum binderianum was commonly present.

Roots of papyrus probably mainly young roots are eaten when the parts of the plants above the surface have died.

  1. Males and females both possess two glands that open between the eye and ear. At birth an elephant has two or three pairs of cheek teeth in each jaw.
  2. African elephants have two such extremities one above and one below ; Asian elephants have one. The elephantidae elephants and mammoths the tusks are gently curved upwards but are smaller than the african elephant's, and the ears are smaller as well.
  3. While a wide variety of plant species may be included in the diet, often a relative few make up the bulk of the diet.
  4. Where food is plentiful, the groups join together. B Foods eaten appears to vary seasonally.
  5. Rumbling sounds initially thought to be caused by intestinal activity are now known to be produced by the voice box larynx and are considered to be similar to purring in cats.

Roots of reeds such as phragmites are also eaten. Grasses consumed included Sporabolus pyramidalis and Hyparrhenia sp.

During the period August to May, in a long grass area, the diet contained grass In both areas, but particularly in the short grass area, browse consumption increased in the dry season. It was noted that some browse was eaten in the long grass area even when some effort would have been required to find it, while in the short grass area, grass remained the dominant part of the diet even when browse was readily available and could have been eaten exclusively.

  • Stomach contents, however, are acidic and would irritate the skin;
  • Migration Elephants migrate seasonally according to the availability of food and water;
  • African elephants eat grass, foliage, bark and twigs from trees, herbs, shrubs, roots and fruit.

An additional function may be adsorption of toxic secondary plant compounds such as phenols in browse, with some soils chosen having high levels of kaolin e.