Essays academic service


An examination of the works of wallace stevens and emily dickinson

What exactly is this expatriated national tradition in European university curricula?

This question is particularly charged for me as an American teacher, as I find myself trying to tie trends together which, back home, might be left untied or unsaid-or even unperceived. Much of American criticism currently underscores the Romantic, as well as Puritan, influences on the former while insisting, as always, on the French influences i. In effect, each poet is battling within the same theological system: Dickinson engages in the Puritan dilemma by stressing her own voice and her own personal connection to the transcendent, her own emotional relationship to the natural elements of her native Amherst: Indeed, both poets, despite a despondent tone in certain poems, belie, over and over again, a buoyant belief in the human capacity to experience and express joy — an echo, over all, of a general American faith in self-creation, whether to be achieved through the heart or mind, through faith or works.

Faber and Faber, 1975. All poems from this edition. Faber and Faber, 1953.

Féminin/masculin

Her confidence is that she can express and harmonize with this tune: Stevens is no less metaphysical or religious than Dickinson. Establishing a sense of intimacy, she writes: The poet and the bird are in harmony with a sense of God as responsive, the father of sound himself.

  • The bird marks the edge of each circle, and each stanza as the fourth dimension, the blind spot;
  • She expresses sorrow, then, if the voice does not sing, if the bird is dead 1102;
  • While for Dickinson, who similarly sees the bird as a frontier between the human and death see poem 221, where the blackbirds sing before death , the bird is always distinctly other, for Stevens, the bird can be the poet, or it can be the act of poetry, or even death itself;
  • Indeed, both poets, despite a despondent tone in certain poems, belie, over and over again, a buoyant belief in the human capacity to experience and express joy — an echo, over all, of a general American faith in self-creation, whether to be achieved through the heart or mind, through faith or works.

She expresses sorrow, then, if the voice does not sing, if the bird is dead 1102. While for Dickinson, who similarly sees the bird as a frontier between the human and death see poem 221, where the blackbirds sing before deaththe bird is always distinctly other, for Stevens, the bird can be the poet, or it can be the act of poetry, or even death itself.

“Blackbirds and Robins: the ‘America’ of Wallace Stevens and Emily Dickinson”

At times, for example, the poet makes the bird in his own image: To stress that this bird is identical to the poet seeking his voice, the narrator adds: It becomes creepy not because of what it is, but of what it suggests: The bird marks the edge of each circle, and each stanza as the fourth dimension, the blind spot.

What of — my Music!

  • Faber and Faber, 1953;
  • America is powerfully evoked-and yet not named — in the repeated images of shores and frontiers, in which the poet asserts her presence — her I — between these borders;
  • In effect, each poet is battling within the same theological system;
  • On this wondrous sea;
  • Her confidence is that she can express and harmonize with this tune:

The childlike skip can be heard in both. America is powerfully evoked-and yet not named — in the repeated images of shores and frontiers, in which the poet asserts her presence — her I — between these borders. On this wondrous sea.