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An in depth look at the european country of ireland

See Article History Alternative Titles: Ireland is also renowned for its wealth of folklore, from tales of tiny leprechauns with hidden pots of gold to that of the patron saintPatrickwith his legendary ridding the island of snakes and his reputed use of the three-leaved shamrock as a symbol for the Christian Trinity. The emergence of Ireland as an independent country is a fairly recent phenomenon.

Until the 17th century, political power was widely shared among a rather loosely constructed network of small earldoms in often-shifting alliances. The island was an integral part of the United Kingdom from 1800 to 1922, when, by virtue of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, the Irish Free State was established as a self-governing dominion of the British Empire.

Ipsos MRBI asked 500 Irish people which European countries they fancied.

Independence came in 1937, but Ireland remained a member of the British Commonwealth until 1948. Since then Ireland has become integrated with the rest of western Europe. The treaty, however, was approved by Irish voters in a second referendum, held the following year. Some 40 million Americans trace their ancestry to Ireland as a result of that traumatic exodus, as do millions of others throughout the world.

  • Drainage The rivers that rise on the seaward side of the coastal mountain fringe are naturally short and rapid;
  • The island was an integral part of the United Kingdom from 1800 to 1922, when, by virtue of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, the Irish Free State was established as a self-governing dominion of the British Empire;
  • Old Red Sandstone predominates in the south, where the parallel folded mountain ridges trend east-west, separated by limestone river valleys.

Every year members of this diaspora visit their ancestral homeland and forge connections with long-lost family. Other principal centres include WaterfordWexfordand Drogheda on the east coast, Sligo in the northwest, and Limerick and Galway in the west.

  • The government has implemented major arterial drainage projects, preventing flooding—and making more land available for cultivation—by improving the flow of water in the rivers and thereby lowering the levels of lakes;
  • Every year members of this diaspora visit their ancestral homeland and forge connections with long-lost family;
  • Snow is infrequent except in the mountains, and prolonged or severe snowstorms are rare;
  • Other principal centres include Waterford , Wexford , and Drogheda on the east coast, Sligo in the northwest, and Limerick and Galway in the west.

View of Dublin from the River Liffey. An acre of stony ground, Where the symbolic rose can break in flower, Old ragged elms, old thorns innumerable, The sound of the rain or sound Of every wind that blows; The stilted water-hen Scared by the splashing of a dozen cows. Land The republic of Ireland occupies the greater part of an island lying to the west of Great Britain, from which it is separated—at distances ranging from 11 to 120 miles 18 to 193 km —by the North Channelthe Irish Seaand St.

Ireland, which, like Great Britain, once formed part of this landmass, lies on the European continental shelfsurrounded by seas that are generally less than 650 feet 200 metres deep. The greatest distance from north to south in the island is 302 miles 486 kmand from east to west it is 171 miles 275 km.

Aerial view of Ireland's coastline. This plain is ringed almost completely by coastal highlands, which vary considerably in geologic structure. The flatness of the central lowland—which lies for the most part between 200 and 400 feet 60 and 120 metres above sea level—is relieved in many places by low hills between 600 and 1,000 feet 180 to 300 metres in elevation.

With many lakes, large bog areas, and low ridges, the lowland is very scenic. In the west and southwest the wild and beautiful coast is heavily indented where the mountains of DonegalMayoGalway, and Kerry thrust out into the Atlantic, separated by deep wide-mouthed bays, some of which— Bantry Bay and Dingle Bayfor example—are, in fact, drowned river valleys.

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In the west and northwest as well as in the east, the mountains are composed mainly of granite. Old Red Sandstone predominates in the south, where the parallel folded mountain ridges trend east-west, separated by limestone river valleys.

  • The famed River Shannon , for example, rises in the plateau country near Sligo Bay and flows sluggishly south-southwestward for some 160 miles 260 km , reaching tidewater level at Limerick and draining a wide area of the central lowland on its way;
  • The government has implemented major arterial drainage projects, preventing flooding—and making more land available for cultivation—by improving the flow of water in the rivers and thereby lowering the levels of lakes;
  • Some 40 million Americans trace their ancestry to Ireland as a result of that traumatic exodus, as do millions of others throughout the world.

Ireland experienced at least two general glaciations —one covering most of the country and the other extending as far south as a line linking Limerick, Casheland Dublin—and the characteristic diversity of Irish scenery owes much to this glacial influence. The large areas of peat bog to be found throughout the country are a notable feature of the landscape.

Ireland country profile

Drainage The rivers that rise on the seaward side of the coastal mountain fringe are naturally short and rapid. The famed River Shannonfor example, rises in the plateau country near Sligo Bay and flows sluggishly south-southwestward for some 160 miles 260 kmreaching tidewater level at Limerick and draining a wide area of the central lowland on its way. Other major inland rivers—some of them renowned for their salmon fisheries—are the SlaneyLiffeyand Boyne in the east; the Nore, Barrowand Suir in the southeast; the BlackwaterLee, and Bandon in the south; and the Clare and the Moy in the west.

Because of the porosity of the underlying Carboniferous limestones, an underground drainage system has developed, feeding the interlacing surface network of rivers and lakes. The government has implemented major arterial drainage projects, preventing flooding—and making more land available for cultivation—by improving the flow of water in the rivers and thereby lowering the levels of lakes.

Which countries do Irish people wish Ireland was more like?

There are also state-aided farm-drainage schemes designed to bring wasteland and marginal land into production. Soils Most Irish soils originate from drift, the ice-scoured waste formerly frozen to the base of the advancing glaciers. In many places, however, these have been overlaid by patches of the ice-borne drift, mostly limestone-bearing, which are farmed with considerable success. The bare limestone regions remaining in western areas show how much glacial drift cover has meant to the Irish agricultural economy.

The predominant influence is the Atlantic Oceanwhich is no more than 70 miles 113 km from any inland location. The mild southwesterly winds and warm waters of the North Atlantic Current contribute to the moderate quality of the climate. Temperature is almost uniform over the entire island. The sunniest months are May and June, when there is sunshine for an average duration of 5.

Average annual precipitation varies from about 30 inches 760 mm in the east to more than 100 inches 2,533 mm in the western areas exposed to the darkening clouds that often come sweeping in from the Atlantic. Snow is infrequent except in the mountains, and prolonged or severe snowstorms are rare. Page 1 of 16.