Essays academic service


Around the world in 80 days writer

  • Also in all three of these books, Verne focuses on one or two people or things about them, and really emphasizes it;
  • I like to imagine that my journey around Jules Verne's universe took about 80 reading sessions, and that I returned the books to the library so much more enthusiastic about the world of reading that I was ready for my life as a reader;
  • Although these articles may currently differ in style from others on the site, they allow us to provide wider coverage of topics sought by our readers, through a diverse range of trusted voices.

This was the first Jules Verne book I read. I carried it home in a heavy school bag, in the darkness after an winter afternoon in the public library.

  • These novels sold progressively less well;
  • Only in 1978 was the question settled;
  • Although these articles may currently differ in style from others on the site, they allow us to provide wider coverage of topics sought by our readers, through a diverse range of trusted voices.

I was ten, and I had to fill my long evenings, which started at sun set around half past two. I still remember the smell of the book, picked from the "Classics for children" section, and how I opened it "Mum, could we travel the world in the same way that Phileas Fogg and Passepartout did? I still remember the smell of the book, picked from the "Classics for children" section, and how I opened it and started reading.

I knew almost nothing of Victorian England, of travelling to exotic countries, of the honour connected to a wager, of foul play or of religious customs in other cultures or of nature's peculiarities in different geographical areas.

According to my memory, I finished the story that same evening, and went back to the library the very next day to check out the entire stock of Jules Verne.

Keep Exploring Britannica

I might be wrong, knowing the strange turns memory takes when something is considered of special importance. It might have been two or three days later. It is a fact, though, that I read all of his novels that dark winter, one after the other, completely enthralled, completely lost in the storytelling. And as fast as I was captured, I was released again.

Around the World in Eighty Days

I had that Jules Verne spell, I loved it, but I never looked back. Jules Verne made me realise the potential of books, helped me open the treasure chest of world literature, and he served as a bridge to ever bigger journeys around the literary world. I like to imagine that my journey around Jules Verne's universe took about 80 reading sessions, and that I returned the books to the library so much more enthusiastic about the world of reading that I was ready for my life as a reader.

Afterwards I instinctively felt that those books should remain in my childhood, that I might find things in them I would find ludicrous or horrible now.

  1. And of course I enjoy each minute my children spend with Jules Verne.
  2. This wisdom is situated somewhere between a hopeless pessimism and a blind optimism. Another is that they all involve a journey of some sort.
  3. Jules Gabriel Verne was born in Nantes, France in 1828.
  4. Robur is a rebel, a spiritual descendant of Nemo, a man whose brilliant aeronautical ideas are ignored and who resorts to violence to prove his point.

But the initiation rite of reading Verne when I was an impressionable ten-year-old will always be a memory of great importance to me. And of course I enjoy each minute my children spend with Jules Verne. More routined globetrotters than I was, they ask different questions, and reflect more on the radically changed technology and knowledge since the time of Phileas Fogg, whereas I had difficulties understanding the cultural codes in the world - which my children recognise directly from long experience in international schools.

  • Born as the second child of four, in a middle class Nantes family, his schooldays were reasonably successful without being brilliant;
  • Much of the richness and poetry of the novel depends on the antagonism between the characters Fogg and Passepartout;
  • I might be wrong, knowing the strange turns memory takes when something is considered of special importance;
  • His father was outraged when he heard that Jules was not going to continue law and discontinued the money he was giving him to pay for his expenses in Paris;
  • I might be wrong, knowing the strange turns memory takes when something is considered of special importance;
  • Only in 1978 was the question settled.

The main plot remains exciting, and the cheesy conclusion is as rewarding as any modern "happy end" could be: What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought back from this long and weary journey? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men! Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?

Luckily, we still have the option to travel with Fogg and Passepartout!