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Describe feature of an inclusive setting for children

The main legislation relating to equality, diversity and inclusion are: This Act provides a single legal framework with clear legislation effectively to tackle disadvantage and discrimination. The main provisions of the equality Act were introduced from October 2010 while the rest will be phased in over 2010-2013.

It is important to support participation and equality of access so that every pupil has the same opportunities offered to them regardless of personal background. I believe that involving the children in this process would make the children more confident and feel more valued.

The Equality Act 2010 states that there are seven different types of discrimination, which are: This includes carers of disabled people and elderly relatives, who can claim they were treated unfairly because of duties that had to carry out at home relating to their care work. It also covers discrimination against someone because, for example, his or her partner is from another country. Employees can claim they find something offensive even when it's not directed at them.

It is important that describe feature of an inclusive setting for children school has regular reviews of the policies, procedures and practices to make sure that all children and young people have right to participation and equality of access. It is what gives groups of people in our society their identity.

It also refers to the way groups live, for example, shared customs, thoughts, arts, language and social activity. Recognising and promoting the cultural diversity of individuals and groups within the school will enrich learning and promote the knowledge and understanding of all pupils.

We may work with children whose home language is not English, particularly if we are bilingual ouself. It is important that schools celebrate the bilingual or multilingual skills of pupils. Schools will have a policy in place which states how to ensure inclusive practice, including the additional support for pupils who need to improve their English. It is important that we understand the cultural diversity of the pupils within the school and particularly those you are supporting.

We will then be able to help pupils to make sense of their learning by making connections to their own lives. Our role may include providing pastoral support to individual children. Understanding and taking account of their background and culture is essential for us to build eff ective relationships and provide support.

The diverse cultures in society should be recognised and reflected throughout the curriculum.

  • It is important that we examine our own attitudes and values critically, to consider how these may impact on how do children feel when they are excluded?
  • Promoting an understanding of cultural diversity will help to prevent stereotyping and reduce prejudice and discrimination;
  • When we are concerned about anti-discriminatory practice, whether by staff or pupils in the school, we should speak to our manager or supervisor at the school or college tutor;
  • Inclusive settings can make this vision a reality for many children with disabilities;
  • This may be informal or through a school council or form representatives.

For example, incorporating music, foods, stories and drama from a range of cultures will contribute to a rich curriculum. This will demonstrate that we are not only valuing the culture of groups but also supporting all pupils to explore and understand cultures which are diff erent from their own. Where cultural diversity is only acknowledged through posters, or at only particular times of the year through festivals, it could be viewed as tokenism. Promoting an understanding of cultural diversity will help to prevent stereotyping and reduce prejudice and discrimination.

Everyone working in schools must be aware of ways that children can experience prejudice and discrimination. Prejudice can occur through lack of knowledge and understanding of diversity.

Prejudice is making assumptions about children or young people because they belong to a particular group. For example, a child who has a disability may be assumed to have learning difficulties. Prejudice and labelling can often lead to discrimination. Discrimination happens when children do not receive equality of opportunity.

We may all feel that we have been discriminated against at some time in our lives, perhaps because of gender or age. Some individuals or groups are more likely to experience discrimination. This may happen because of their race, culture, social background, sexual orientation, special educational needs or disability.

Types of discrimintation Direct discrimination: This happens when children and young people are not allowed to access part of the curriculum and school activities because of their particular situation such as race, gender or disability. This is often more difficult to spot.

What is an inclusive setting?

A child will not be excluded directly but will be unable to participate because of their personal situation. It is essential that every school must produce a range of policies which formally sets out the guidelines and procedures for ensuring equality. Below is a list of the legislations which form the basic government statutory codes of practice and frameworks that school policies and procedures should have in relation to equality and inclusion.

  • A child will not be excluded directly but will be unable to participate because of their personal situation;
  • It is essential that every school must produce a range of policies which formally sets out the guidelines and procedures for ensuring equality;
  • Prejudice is making assumptions about children or young people because they belong to a particular group;
  • It also refers to the way groups live, for example, shared customs, thoughts, arts, language and social activity;
  • We may all feel that we have been discriminated against at some time in our lives, perhaps because of gender or age;
  • Understanding and taking account of their background and culture is essential for us to build eff ective relationships and provide support.

It also places a duty on schools and other organisations to eliminate barriers to ensure that individuals can gain equal access to services Places a duty for schools to produce a Disability Equality Scheme DES and an access plan. Schools must encourage participation in all aspects of school life and eliminate harassment and unlawful discrimination Makes it unlawful for educational providers to discriminate against pupils with a special educational need or a disability.

When children or young people feel they are being discriminated against they may experience: Prejudice and discrimination can only have negative effects on children and young people. As well as affecting academic progress of children, discrimination can negatively impact their overall health and well-being. All those working in the school have a legal duty to protect the rights of children and young people.

What is an inclusive setting?

It is important that we examine our own attitudes and values critically, to consider how these may impact on how do children feel when they are excluded?

Personal prejudices, which may lead to discriminatory practice, can be overcome through developing a greater understanding of diverse groups in society.

For example, you can overcome them by finding out about the religious beliefs and cultures of the children you work with, and by knowing about any special educational needs or disabilities. We must not make assumptions about children and young people.

Finding out about their backgrounds, interests, abilities and individual needs will help us to provide more effective, appropriate and personalised support. They must also monitor the ways that positive practice impacts on the education and well-being of the children and young people.

  • Where children experience difficulties such as special educational needs or disabilities, there is a an approach which focuses on what the child or young person can do rather than the difficulties they are experiencing;
  • Worldwide Worldwide, inclusion takes on a wider meaning.

It is not easy to change the views of others but we must challenge discriminatory comments and actions. It is important to learn assertiveness strategies that can help when we recognise discrimination. When challenging discrimination, we should: When we are concerned about anti-discriminatory practice, whether by staff or pupils in the school, we should speak to our manager or supervisor at the school or college tutor.

The code of practice to promote race equality includes the duty of the school to monitor and report to the Local Education Authority LEA on all racist incidents. When discrimination takes place it may be intentional, but it can also be because of ignorance and lack of understanding.

The Benefits of Inclusive Education

Inclusive practice is a process of identifying, understanding and breaking down barriers to participation and belonging. Inclusion is about ensuring that children and young people, whatever their background or situation, are able to participate fully in all aspects of the life of the school.

Inclusive practices will ensure that everyone feels valued and has a sense of belonging. Inclusion is not about viewing everyone as the same or providing the same work, but about providing the same opportunities and access to a high quality of education. In an inclusive environment there is recognition, acceptance and celebration of differences and similarities. The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001, and statutory guidance in the Special Educational Needs Codes of Practice 2001, mean that the majority of children with special educational needs and disabilities are now educated in mainstream schools.

This does not exclude children from attending specialist educational setting if that is more appropriate and will provide for pupils with more complex needs. To understand the issue of inclusive practice for children and young people, it is helpful to understand the medical and social model of disability. The medical model of disability - the medical model is based on an assumption that the child must adapt to the environment which exists.

The social model starts with the assumption that the way a school operates, the barriers present and diff erent attitudes can prevent individuals from participating in society. This view of disability works to empower children and young people.

The social model of disability - inclusive practice is based upon the social model of disability. An inclusive setting is one which uses a whole-school approach to learning. Barriers are recognised and describe feature of an inclusive setting for children used to remove them.

Where children experience difficulties such as special educational needs or disabilities, there is a an approach which focuses on what the child or young person can do rather than the difficulties they are experiencing.

What is an inclusive setting?

For example, a pupil with English as an additional language will receive language support in the classroom. This may be informal or through a school council or form representatives. The ways in which the values and principles are put into practice may vary depending on the type of organisation and its role in the education and care of children and young people.

According to the National Curriculum Inclusion Statement, schools must implement a whole-school approach to both the national and wider curriculum. Promoting well-being through an inclusive curriculum: The key role of the school is to provide a good-quality education through an inclusive curriculum, but the school also has a wider roleto consider in ensuring the well-being of children.

Programmes such as citizenship and personal, social and health education help to build relationships and also prepare children for living and working in the wider society. Schools and other childcare services must demonstrate ways that they work toward each of the five outcomes: Schools may need to work with specialist services, such as physiotherapy or speech therapy, so that children are able to reach their full potential.