Essays academic service


Education system and the importance of paying attention to the needs of special education students

ADHDASDAutism Spectrum Disorderschildren with disabilitieschildren with special needsdiversityearly childhood educationeducational technologyexclusionfull inclusioninclusioninclusive practicesIntellectual DisabilitiesLatin American educationLearning DisabiltiesNeurodiversityneuroplasticitysocial networksSpecial Educationstrength-based learningteacher expectations This is a presentation I made at the 16th Encuentro Internacional de Educacion Inicial y Preescolar in Monterrey, Mexico on October 15th,which focused this year on inclusion and diversity.

Speakers from all over Latin America, the U. Here is my paper: Giving All Kids a Chance to Succeed: Think back to your own experiences from childhood or adolescence.

To be excluded from a social group can bring up feelings of isolation, anxiety, doubt, confusion, humiliation, loneliness, and sadness, among many other painful emotions.

  • Set reasonable goals and ask questions about the assignment while they are working;
  • These students function below grade level, have low achievement scores, are frequently immature, and work slowly;
  • Another important component that can help students with disabilities succeed in the regular classroom is the judicious use of new technologies;
  • The problem occurs when you have one or two gifted students in a room of average or below average learners.

Knowing this, it is tragic to learn that most of Latin American children with disabilities are excluded from being part of a normal school program. Having a disability can be a greater obstacle to education than being poor. With a view to realizing this right without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunity, States Parties shall ensure an inclusive education system at all levels.

  1. Tap into different learning styles.
  2. Provide quiet places for students to work.
  3. Depending on the student, you can also ask for parents to sign off each evening, getting parent involved in the homework responsibility.
  4. Students who have communication or articulation difficulties, for example, can use an augmentative or alternative communication application such as Proloquo2Go, which translates icon-labeled buttons related to specific needs and requests e. Set reasonable goals and ask questions about the assignment while they are working.
  5. Since focus is a big issue, moving around and standing near the student will help. Diversity enriches our lives.

Including children with disabilities in regular classrooms is important not simply because the United Nations says it is so, nor because it seems morally right to do so. Rather, there are some fundamental reasons why integrating students with disabilities into the mainstream of education improves the learning outcomes for all children.

Students with disabilities add to the diversity of the classroom. Diversity enriches our lives. How boring it would be if every student looked and acted the same in school! Students with disabilities bring new strengths into the classroom. Unfortunately, all too often we focus on what children with disabilities lack when we should be paying attention to what they do well. New research is emerging on a yearly basis regarding the many strengths of those with disabilities including high spatial ability for many kids with dyslexia, creative thinking in students with ADHD, systemic capabilities such as excellence with computers among those with autism spectrum disorders, and personal charm and human warmth in many students with intellectual abilities such as Down syndrome.

Students with disabilities help promote a climate of giving in the classroom. Isabel made the other children less selfish. Similarly, students with special needs can humanize any educational environment by sending a message to students that we all need to pitch in to help each other out in life. Students with disabilities do better when in a setting where more is expected of them.

Students with disabilities challenge us to provide better ways to educate ALL kids. To create an effective inclusion classroom, educators need to build a learning environment that provides a variety of ways in which learning content is represented, engaged with, and assessed see below for some suggestions. This process benefits all learners, not just those with disabilities, since research reveals that all children have different ways of learning. Since that time, research has extended this understanding to humans, particularly in the newly emerging field of neuroplasticity.

Young children are in a sensitive developmental period with regard to their openness to neural imprinting from external stimuli, thus all children, including those with special needs, benefit greatly from an optimal learning environment. Inclusive educational practices will not succeed unless educators are willing to put the time and effort into creating such optimal classroom settings.

Most important in helping to accomplish this aim is finding out as much as possible about the strengths, talents, and abilities of the children with disabilities who will be included in the mainstream environment. Once a list of strengths have been identified for the child with disabilities, the educator must go to work developing learning strategies that help the student succeed academically, behaviorally, and socially.

So, for example, if a student with an autism spectrum disorder has an absorbing interest in a specific area of knowledge as many students identified with ASD dothen providing time during the classroom day for the student to share that interest with classmates during, for example, a sharing time will help him develop much needed social skills. Another important component that can help students with disabilities succeed in the regular classroom is the judicious use of new technologies.

Students who have communication or articulation difficulties, for example, can use an augmentative or alternative communication application such as Proloquo2Go, which translates icon-labeled buttons related to specific needs and requests e.

Similarly, children with sight impairment can make use of apps that translate text on the computer screen into the spoken word for example, Google Text-to-speech. For students who have difficulties with reading or writing, the use of speech-to-text software like Dragon Naturally Speakingcan help bridge the gap between oral language strengths and written language problems.

A key ingredient in the success of any inclusion program must involve addressing the social environment in the classroom. Teachers should learn how to draw sociograms for each child or at least each child with a disability education system and the importance of paying attention to the needs of special education students, indicating positive friendships, antagonistic relationships, and potentially supportive connections, both inside and outside of the classroom.

In this way, for example destructive relationships can be identified such as an intimidating bully and dealt with through an anti-bullying program. As the United Nations charter makes clear, reasonable environmental modifications should also be made as a component of inclusive classroom program implementation.

  • The challenge is finding a way to help them learn;
  • If I find a student can easily do two digit division, I will challenge them with 3 digit problems;
  • I believe should be in every classroom.

This may involve ramps and other ease-of-access modifications for the physically disabled child for example, the opportunity to do art work on the wall or an accessible table, as opposed to the floor, for the child who uses a wheelchair. For the child diagnosed with ASD who has acute sensitivities to sound, headphones that block out extraneous noises might be indicated.

For the child diagnosed with ADHD, sitting on a stability ball rather than a chair may calm the student down and focus his attention. Each of these modifications can be made without undue expense, extra training, or major difficulties in implementation, and they can make marked positive changes in behavior and academic achievement. Finally, the presentation of positive role models with disabilities and a focus on positive careers tailored to the strengths of people with disabilities, represents an important all-class solution to normalizing the experience of being different, an attitudinal modification that can have powerful effects on the behavior and achievement of all students, but particularly those with disabilities.

If exclusion is a painful experience, then inclusion is, conversely, a delightful experience. The United Nations convention recognizes this basic human truth when it says that all people deserve to be included in the social institutions of culture.

This is especially true when it comes to early childhoood education when students are just beginning to form ideas about social roles and cultural norms.

6 Reasons for Fully Including Children with Special Needs in Regular Classrooms

For more information about strengths associated with disabilities, see my book The Power of Neurodiversity: Remapping the World of Autism, New York: Basic Books,p. Crown House Publications, ; and P. An excellent online resource for the use of technology tools that differentiate, see the National Center on Universal Design for Learning, http: See my book Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 3rd ed.

One of the principal investigators in neuroplasticity research has written a wonderful book on stimulating learning activities for children: Marian Diamond, Magic Trees of the Mind: For more strategies on including students with special needs in the regular classroom, see Thomas Armstrong, Neurodiversity in the Classroom: