Essays academic service


Explain the naming conventions used to identify internet host computers

This is the name that previous Windows versions stored in browser and master browser lists, enabling peer Windows networks to browse resources on networked Windows computers.

  • This was useful for small, peer-based Windows networks, but networks soon grew beyond what the use of broadcasts and simple flat-file master browser lists could service;
  • Within Example, the devices are addressed by their hostnames;
  • With the capability to have the same host name in different domains, the necessity arose for a name that properly addressed the DNS hierarchy;
  • With WINS, the term computer name was retained, but the term host name also appeared and was used interchangeably with computer name;
  • Allowed characters are defined in RFC 1123 as follows:

In this scenario, the term associated with the computer was computer name. This was useful for small, peer-based Windows networks, but networks soon grew beyond what the use of broadcasts and simple flat-file master browser lists could service.

  • Networks grew, and WINS became less capable of handling the growing volume of names;
  • The general idea should already be clear by now;
  • If this is the case, consider revising the names of your computers to the Internet DNS standard;
  • In addition to these, a computer might also be identified by the FQDN comprised of the computer or host name and a connection-specific domain name, where one is configured and applied for a specific network connection on the computer;
  • As an example, a student at MIT may be able to send mail to "joe csail" and have it automatically qualified by the mail system to be sent to joe csail;
  • The decreasing capability of WINS to handle the name-resolution load was not due to the processing power required for resolution, but instead, to the fact that generating unique names for lots of computers became an ever-increasing management burden.

These repositories could service a larger network. With this development, name-resolution queries could be directed to a WINS server rather than being broadcast and conflicts could be centrally arbitrated.

With WINS, the term computer name was retained, but the term host name also appeared and was used interchangeably with computer name. At the time, WINS was the default name-resolver for Windows platforms, but DNS was gaining with the popularity and proliferation of larger and larger networks. Networks grew, and WINS became less capable of handling the growing volume of names.

What is the best naming conventions for computers and domains?

The decreasing capability of WINS to handle the name-resolution load was not due to the processing power required for resolution, but instead, to the fact that generating unique names for lots of computers became an ever-increasing management burden. Fully Qualified Domain Name DNS is a better solution; with its hierarchical name space, the need for unique computer names is isolated to a given domain, enabling a computer name such as server1 to exist in different domain locations in the same hierarchy.

With the capability to have the same host name in different domains, the necessity arose for a name that properly addressed the DNS hierarchy. The name had to include not only the computer name or host name, but also a name that could unambiguously identify, or fully qualify, that computer within the entire DNS hierarchy. That name is the fully qualified domain name FQDN — for example, server1.

  • Note The feedback system for this content will be changing soon;
  • For more information on the upcoming change, we invite you to read our blog post;
  • Internet hostnames[ edit ] On the Internet, a hostname is a domain name assigned to a host computer.

However, in certain situations, the domain-hierarchy part of the FQDN is cumbersome and a local name for a given computer or any other DNS host that is relative to the DNS domain in which the host resides is needed.

That name is the relative distinguished name. The following figure illustrates how to identify the computer-name or host-name, or relative distinguished name part of the FQDN: Note The feedback system for this content will be changing soon.

Determining a good naming convention for your network

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  1. This is because most other DNS resolver client software is based on RFC 1123, the specification that standardizes Internet host naming requirements.
  2. So, for example, both en. The process of adjusting your naming conventions might prove to be time consuming.
  3. The domain names of the devices would be saturn. However, Microsoft Windows NT-based computers can have computer names that consist only of numbers.
  4. The process of adjusting your naming conventions might prove to be time consuming.

For more information on the upcoming change, we invite you to read our blog post.