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The causes of the decline of the greek civilization

Ancient Greece was one of the dominant civilizations in the Mediterranean and the world for hundreds of years. Like all civilizations, however, Ancient Greece eventually fell into decline and was conquered by the Romansa new and rising world power.

Alexander was a great general. He proceeded to conquer all of the lands between Greece and India including Egypt.

  1. Therefore, fighting such a war very likely would have wrecked Athens' finances and given Philip the victory anyway.
  2. We have already seen in detail how Sparta defeated Athens in the Peloponnesian War.
  3. Meanwhile, the Athenians had formed a second Delian League with various Aegean states, promising to treat them better than they had treated the first Delian League. Constant warring between the city states weakened Greece and made it difficult to unite against a common enemy like Rome.
  4. Sparta's gains from the Peloponnesian War were quickly slipping away. If the Persian Wars were the great epic of Greek history, the century of conflict between Greek poleis from 431 to 338 B.

Greece Divided When Alexander the Great died, there was a huge gap in power. Alexander's empire was divided among his generals. These new divisions soon began fighting. Although the Greek culture had spread throughout much of the world, it was politically divided.

  • Political- Athenians started the Delian League, which was a alliance of Greeks to defend against Persia if they attacked again;
  • Alexander was a great general;
  • Men were fighting in war so women were left to work and care for children;
  • Art, including sculpture was very important;
  • Continuing warfare after the Peloponnesian War 404-355 B;
  • Bit by bit, Philip worked his way southward, with only a few Greeks recognizing what was happening.

During this time, the city-states of Greece fell into decline. As Rome grew more powerful, the Greeks started to see Rome as a threat.

Ancient Greece

Rome declared war on Macedonia northern Greece. Battle of Corinth Rome continued its conquest of Greece. Rome completely destroyed and plundered the city of Corinth as an example to other Greek cities. From this point on Greece was ruled by Rome. Despite being ruled by Rome, much of the Greek culture remained the same and had a heavy influence on Roman culture. Primary Causes There were many factors that went into the decline and fall of Ancient Greece.

Here are some of the primary causes: Greece was divided into city-states. Constant warring between the city states weakened Greece and made it difficult to unite against a common enemy like Rome.

  • Bit by bit, Philip worked his way southward, with only a few Greeks recognizing what was happening;
  • Some historians consider this to be the end of the Hellenistic Period;
  • However, in all fairness, the Athens faced a difficult dilemma, since acting against Philip could have been as ruinous as not moving to stop him;
  • This would bring about not only the downfall of that state, but also the rise of another polis to dominance, causing the other poleis to gang up on that state, and so on;
  • A tricky back-stepping maneuver by the Macedonian phalanx lured the Athenians out of position, exposing the Thebans to the decisive cavalry charge led by Philip's eighteen-year old son, Alexander;
  • It was his successor, Philip II, who would build a strong kingdom on the ruins of this disaster.

The poorer classes in Greece began to rebel against the aristocracy and the wealthy. The city-states of Ancient Greece had different governments and were constantly changing alliances. Greek colonies had a similar culture, but were not strong allies to Greece or any of the Greek city-states.

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Rome rose to power and became stronger than the individual city-states of Greece. Some historians consider this to be the end of the Hellenistic Period. The Greek language continued to be the main language used in the eastern part of the Roman Empire for hundreds of years.

Life in Greece continued much the same under Roman rule.

  • Classical Greece may still have valuable lessons to offer its cultural and political offspring, the somewhat troubled Europe of twenty first century;
  • Leading the way were the Athenians who replaced the Spartan backed and repressive oligarchy of The Thirty with a new democracy;
  • Classical Greece may still have valuable lessons to offer its cultural and political offspring, the somewhat troubled Europe of twenty first century.

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