Essays academic service


The importance of immigration in the human mind

Abstract Brain drain is defined as the migration of health personnel in search of the better standard of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in different places worldwide.

This migration of health professionals for better opportunities, both within countries and across international borders, is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on health systems in developing countries. Why do talented people leave their countries and go abroad?

  • Higher education is one of the principal conduits of permanent emigration;
  • The intellectuals of any country are some of the most expensive resources because of their training in terms of material cost and time, and most importantly, because of lost opportunity;
  • Young, well-educated, healthy individuals are most likely to migrate, especially in pursuit of higher education and economic improvement;
  • This is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on the health systems in developing countries;
  • International migration first emerged as a major public health concern in the 1940s when many European professionals emigrated to the UK and USA.

What are the consequences of such migrations especially on the educational sector? What policies can be adopted to stem such movements from developing countries to developed countries?

This article seeks to raise questions, identify key issues and provide solutions which would enable immigrant health professionals to share their knowledge, skills and innovative capacities and thereby enhancing the economic development of their countries. However, better standards of living and quality of life, higher salaries, access to advanced technology and more stable political conditions in the developed countries attract talent from less developed areas.

The majority of migration is from developing to developed countries. This is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on the health systems in developing countries. These countries have invested in the education and training of young health professionals.

  1. Young, well-educated, healthy individuals are most likely to migrate, especially in pursuit of higher education and economic improvement. Over three-quarters were found in only three countries.
  2. What policies can be adopted to stem such movements from developing countries to developed countries? Why do talented people leave their countries and go abroad?
  3. One may claim that this migration from developing countries is both useful and unavoidable. What policies can be adopted to stem such movements from developing countries to developed countries?
  4. What are the consequences of such migrations especially on the educational sector?
  5. This translates into a loss of considerable resources when these people migrate, with the direct benefit accruing to the recipient states who have not forked out the cost of educating them.

This translates into a loss of considerable resources when these people migrate, with the direct benefit accruing to the recipient states who have not forked out the cost of educating them.

The intellectuals of any country are some of the most expensive resources because of their training in terms of material cost and time, and most importantly, because of lost opportunity.

INTRODUCTION

In 2000 almost 175 million people, or 2. Of these, about 65 million were economically active.

  • This article seeks to raise questions, identify key issues and provide solutions which would enable immigrant health professionals to share their knowledge, skills and innovative capacities and thereby enhancing the economic development of their countries;
  • This is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on the health systems in developing countries.

International migration first emerged as a major public health concern in the 1940s when many European professionals emigrated to the UK and USA. Over three-quarters were found in only three countries: India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

  1. The majority of migration is from developing to developed countries. The role of governments and recruitment agencies in systematically encouraging the migration of health professionals increases the pull.
  2. This migration of health professionals for better opportunities, both within countries and across international borders, is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on health systems in developing countries.
  3. India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Of these, about 65 million were economically active.
  4. This translates into a loss of considerable resources when these people migrate, with the direct benefit accruing to the recipient states who have not forked out the cost of educating them.

By linking the number of physicians per 10 000 population to gross domestic product GDP per capita, the countries that produced more physicians than they had the capacity to absorb were identified 7 as Egypt, India, Pakistan, Philippines and South Korea. One may claim that this migration from developing countries is both useful and unavoidable. There are definite advantages—enabling the migrant to spend time in other countries—but at the same time, the very low emigration rate of professionals from USA or UK may be as disturbing a sign as the high rates of immigration to these countries.

Brain drain from developing countries: how can brain drain be converted into wisdom gain?

Young, well-educated, healthy individuals are most likely to migrate, especially in pursuit of higher education and economic improvement. The role of governments and recruitment agencies in systematically encouraging the migration of health professionals increases the pull. De-motivating working conditions, coupled with low salaries, are set against the likelihood of prosperity for themselves and their families, work in well-equipped hospitals, and the opportunity for professional development.

  • In 2000 almost 175 million people, or 2;
  • This migration of health professionals for better opportunities, both within countries and across international borders, is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on health systems in developing countries;
  • International migration first emerged as a major public health concern in the 1940s when many European professionals emigrated to the UK and USA;
  • This translates into a loss of considerable resources when these people migrate, with the direct benefit accruing to the recipient states who have not forked out the cost of educating them;
  • This is of growing concern worldwide because of its impact on the health systems in developing countries;
  • Higher education is one of the principal conduits of permanent emigration.

Higher education is one of the principal conduits of permanent emigration.