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The life story of edgar allan poet a writer

  • There he died, although whether from drinking, heart failure , or other causes was still uncertain in the 21st century;
  • This gave rise to the conjecture that Poe was a drug addict, but according to medical testimony he had a brain lesion;
  • Lovecraft, who belong to a distinct tradition of horror literature initiated by Poe;
  • Hoffman and the Gothic novels of Ann Radcliffe, while the despair and melancholy in much of his writing reflects an affinity with the Romantic movement of the early nineteenth century;
  • In addition to his achievement as creator of the modern horror tale, Poe is also credited with parenting two other popular genres:

After his mother died in RichmondVirginia, in 1811, he was taken into the home of John Allan, a Richmond merchant presumably his godfatherand of his childless wife. He was later taken to Scotland and England 1815—20where he was given a classical education that was continued in Richmond.

For 11 months in 1826 he attended the University of Virginiabut his gambling losses at the university so incensed his guardian that he refused to let him continue, and Poe returned to Richmond to find his sweetheart, Sarah Elmira Royster, engaged.

He went to Boston, where in 1827 he published a pamphlet of youthful Byronic poems, Tamerlane, and Other Poems.

  1. Poverty forced him to join the army under the name of Edgar A. With those he loved he was gentle and devoted.
  2. On October 3, he was discovered in a state of semi-consciousness; he died four days later without regaining the necessary lucidity to explain what had happened during the last days of his life. With an air of objectivity and spontaneity, his productions are closely dependent on his own powers of imagination and an elaborate technique.
  3. His keen and sound judgment as an appraiser of contemporary literature, his idealism and musical gift as a poet, his dramatic art as a storyteller, considerably appreciated in his lifetime, secured him a prominent place among universally known men of letters. Hoffman and the Gothic novels of Ann Radcliffe, while the despair and melancholy in much of his writing reflects an affinity with the Romantic movement of the early nineteenth century.

Poverty forced him to join the army under the name of Edgar A. Military Academy at West Point. He successfully sought expulsion from the academy, where he was absent from all drills and classes for a week. He then returned to Baltimore, where he began to write stories.

Edgar Allan Poe

There he made a name as a critical reviewer and married his young cousin Virginia Clemm, who was only 13. Poe seems to have been an affectionate husband and son-in-law. Poe was dismissed from his job in Richmond, apparently for drinking, and went to New York City.

Drinking was in fact to be the bane of his life. To talk well in a large company he needed a slight stimulant, but a glass of sherry might start him on a spree; and, although he rarely succumbed to intoxication, he was often seen in public when he did.

This gave rise to the conjecture that Poe was a drug addict, but according to medical testimony he had a brain lesion. While in New York City in 1838 he published a long prose narrative, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pymcombining as so often in his tales much factual material with the wildest fancies.

The latter contains a study of a neurotic now known to have been an acquaintance of Poe, not Poe himself. Bradbury compares the screenplay with the written work and discusses both the Gothic tradition and Poe's influence on contemporary science fiction.

Willis, thereafter a lifelong friend. Poe then became editor of the Broadway Journal, a short-lived weekly, in which he republished most of his short stories, in 1845.

There was a brief engagement. Poe had close but platonic entanglements with Annie Richmond and with Sarah Anna Lewis, who helped him financially. He composed poetic tributes to all of them.

Edgar Allan Poe: the master of horror writing

In 1849 he went south, had a wild spree in Philadelphia, but got safely to Richmond, where he finally became engaged to Elmira Royster, by then the widowed Mrs. Shelton, and spent a happy summer with only one or two relapses. He enjoyed the companionship of childhood friends and an unromantic friendship with a young poet, Susan Archer Talley. Poe had some forebodings of death when he left Richmond for Baltimore late in September.

There he died, although whether from drinking, heart failureor other causes was still uncertain in the 21st century. He was buried in Westminster Presbyterian churchyard in Baltimore.

It owes much also to his own feverish dreams, to which he applied a rare faculty of shaping plausible fabrics out of impalpable materials. With an air of objectivity and spontaneity, his productions are closely dependent on his own powers of imagination and an elaborate technique. His keen and sound judgment as an appraiser of contemporary literature, his idealism and musical gift as a poet, his dramatic art as a storyteller, considerably appreciated in his lifetime, secured him a prominent place among universally known men of letters.

The wide divergence of contemporary judgments on the man seems almost to point to the coexistence of two persons in him. With those he loved he was gentle and devoted.

  • There he made a name as a critical reviewer and married his young cousin Virginia Clemm, who was only 13;
  • This technique foreshadows the psychological explorations of Fyodor Dostoyevsky and the school of psychological realism;
  • It was while he prepared for his second marriage that Poe, for reasons unknown, arrived in Baltimore in late September of 1849;
  • He was later taken to Scotland and England 1815—20 , where he was given a classical education that was continued in Richmond;
  • While in New York City in 1838 he published a long prose narrative, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym , combining as so often in his tales much factual material with the wildest fancies;
  • There was a brief engagement.

Others, who were the butt of his sharp criticismfound him irritable and self-centred and went so far as to accuse him of lack of principle. He talked brilliantly, chiefly of literature, and read his own poetry and that of others in a voice of surpassing beauty. He admired Shakespeare and Alexander Pope.

He had a sense of humour, apologizing to a visitor for not keeping a pet raven. If the mind of Poe is considered, the duality is still more striking. On one side, he was an idealist and a visionary.

  • The latter contains a study of a neurotic now known to have been an acquaintance of Poe, not Poe himself;
  • Poverty forced him to join the army under the name of Edgar A;
  • Drinking was in fact to be the bane of his life;
  • There was a brief engagement;
  • He formulated rules for the short story , in which he sought the ancient unities:

His yearning for the ideal was both of the heart and of the imagination. This Pythian mood was especially characteristic of the later years of his life. Closely connected with this is his power of ratiocination. He prided himself on his logic and carefully handled this real accomplishment so as to impress the public with his possessing still more of it than he had; hence the would-be feats of thought reading, problem unraveling, and cryptography that he attributed to his characters William Legrand and C.

This suggested to him the analytical tales, which created the detective story, and his science fiction tales.

The same duality is evinced in his art. He was capable of writing angelic or weird poetry, with a supreme sense of rhythm and word appeal, or prose of sumptuous beauty and suggestiveness, with the apparent abandon of compelling inspiration; yet he would write down a problem of morbid psychology or the outlines of an unrelenting plot in a hard and dry style.

As a critic, Poe laid great stress upon correctness of language, metre, and structure. He formulated rules for the short storyin which he sought the ancient unities: To these unities he added that of mood or effect.

He was not extreme in these views, however. He praised longer works and sometimes thought allegories and morals admirable if not crudely presented. Poe admired originality, often in work very different from his own, and was sometimes an unexpectedly generous critic of decidedly minor writers. Indeed his role in French literature was that of a poetic master model and guide to criticism.