Essays academic service


What are the limits of production line approach to service

Prepare a blueprint for a service operation.

Chapter – 4 New Service Development

Describe a service process using the dimensions of divergence and complexity. Use the taxonomy of service processes to classify a service operation. Compare and contrast the generic approaches to service system design.

  • Service is presumed to be performed by individuals for other individuals, generally on a one-to-one basis;
  • Give an example of a service in which isolation of the technical core would be inappropriate;
  • Production-Line Approach Characteristics Routine and simple services High standardization Low customer contact Limited discretionary action of personnel — to get consistency in service performance Division of Labor — total job is broken into groups of simple tasks Substitution of technology for people — example ATM machines Service standardization — limited service options creates opportunities for predictability and preplanning 20 2;
  • What are some drawbacks of customer participation in the service delivery process?
  • There are no such things as service industries.

Managerial Service encounter Service culture Motivation Selection and training Employee empowerment Quality Measurement Monitoring method Expectations versus perceptions Service guarantee Managing capacity and demand Strategies for altering demand and controlling supply Queue management Information Competitive resources Data collection 10 Service Blueprint of Luxury Hotel 11 Strategic Positioning Through Process Structure Degree of Complexity Measured by the number of steps in the service blueprint.

For example a clinic is less complex than a general hospital. Degree of Divergence Amount of discretion permitted the server to customize the service. For example the activities of an attorney contrasted with those of a paralegal.

  1. Object of the Service Process Working on goods of the customer, ex. Purveyors of service, for their part, think that they and their problems are fundamentally different from other businesses and their problems.
  2. Yet we confuse things to our detriment by an outdated taxonomy.
  3. I hope to show in this article that our contradictory notions about service may have malignant consequences.
  4. Haircut or surgical operation High interpersonal skills required as well as technical skills 16 3. For example the activities of an attorney contrasted with those of a paralegal.
  5. It has about 37,000 employees, over half of whom deal directly with the public, either selling them things mostly money and deposit services or helping them with things they have already bought cashing checks, taking additional deposits, writing letters of credit, opening lock-boxes, managing corporate cash. Prepare a blueprint for a service operation.

Bill and Beverage Together Cash only: Degree of divergence Low divergence — standardized service with high volume Tasks are routine Relatively low level of technical skills required Production-line approach, example, McDonalds High divergence — customized services More technical and analytical skills required More flexibility required More capacity required 15 2. Object of the Service Process Working on goods of the customer, ex.

Auto repair Property must be secured from damage or loss Services where the provider provides facilitating goods ex restaurant Appropriate stock levels and the quality of these facilitating goods becomes a concern Processing information Done in back office, ex. Phone banking Processing People, ex.

  • They feel that service is people-intensive, while the rest of the economy is capital-intensive;
  • All the corporate taxonomists, including the U;
  • Only then will they begin to make some significant progress in improving the quality and efficiency of service in the modern economy.

Haircut or surgical operation High interpersonal skills required as well as technical skills 16 3. Type of Customer Contact Decision on level of customer contact will decide the type of training for employees and the design of the facility Indirect via electronic media — no need for service provider at the time of service delivery Indirect via phone — need for service provider at the time of delivery and need for employee interpersonal skills Customer is physically present for part or full service — need for interpersonal skills and also careful planning of service layout 17 Taxonomy of Service Processes Table 4.

  • Type of Customer Contact Decision on level of customer contact will decide the type of training for employees and the design of the facility Indirect via electronic media — no need for service provider at the time of service delivery Indirect via phone — need for service provider at the time of delivery and need for employee interpersonal skills Customer is physically present for part or full service — need for interpersonal skills and also careful planning of service layout 17 Taxonomy of Service Processes Table 4;
  • Degree of divergence Low divergence — standardized service with high volume Tasks are routine Relatively low level of technical skills required Production-line approach, example, McDonalds High divergence — customized services More technical and analytical skills required More flexibility required More capacity required 15 2;
  • If only taxonomy were involved, the consequences of our contradictory classifications would be trivial.

Production-Line Approach Characteristics Routine and simple services High standardization Low customer contact Limited discretionary action of personnel — to get consistency in service performance Division of Labor — total job is broken into groups of simple tasks Substitution of technology for people — example ATM machines Service standardization — limited service options creates opportunities for predictability and preplanning 20 2. Appointments, reservations, price incentives 21 3.

  1. Without its services its sales would shrivel.
  2. In this sense, General Motors is probably more service-intensive than manufacturing-intensive. Production-Line Approach Characteristics Routine and simple services High standardization Low customer contact Limited discretionary action of personnel — to get consistency in service performance Division of Labor — total job is broken into groups of simple tasks Substitution of technology for people — example ATM machines Service standardization — limited service options creates opportunities for predictability and preplanning 20 2.
  3. Purveyors of service, for their part, think that they and their problems are fundamentally different from other businesses and their problems.
  4. So say a lot of people. It has about 270,000 employees, over half of whom deal directly with the public, either selling them things mostly machines or helping them with the things they have already bought installing and repairing machines, writing computer programs, training customers.
  5. But these distinctions are largely spurious. For example the activities of an attorney contrasted with those of a paralegal.

Information Empowerment Employee empowerment — faster and accurate Record keeping customer names Supplier relationship Communication with other firms All aspects of an operation can be integrated ERP systems Customer empowerment Customers can use Internet to educate themselves 23 Customer Value Results produced for the customer Process quality It must satisfy the need for which it was purchased Process quality Since customer is a part of the process of service delivery, therefore improvement in service quality will be appreciated by the customer Price to the customer Greater consistency in service quality should lower cost — because that allows greater alignment between customer perceptions and expectations; resulting in lower price being offered to customer Cost of acquiring the service Total cost of acquiring the service is important to customers 24 Customer Value Equation 25 Discussion Questions What are the limits in the production-line approach to service?

Give an example of a service in which isolation of the technical core would be inappropriate. What are some drawbacks of customer participation in the service delivery process? What ethical issues are raised in the promotion of sales during a service transaction?

In defense of the production-line approach to service