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William shakespeare s seven ages of man

  • The poem is rich in metaphors;
  • The third stage is an enamored young man, lovesick and composing a ballad to his love;
  • The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon, With spectacles on nose, and pouch on side, His youthful hose well sav'd, a world too wide, For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice, Turning again towards childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound.

Men and women are the actors or players on this stage. Actors playing roles have entrances and exits during a performance. Life also has its entrances and exits- people are born and die and pass in and out of our lives.

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Just as an actor plays a variety of roles in life, so too do men and women play different roles or pass through different stages or seven ages of their lives. The speech then focuses on the experience of men.

  • In the second stage of life man plays the role of a small boy or child;
  • Next one is a grown-up soldier, ambitious, devoted to his vows and short-tempered;
  • Later a soldier retires and becomes a judge, using all the wisdom of his age;
  • The first one is an infant, who cries in the arms of his nurse, than he grows to a schoolboy trying to skip the school;
  • And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow.

However it is also possible to consider how the lives of women might be divided into seven ages or stages. The first role or stage is that of an infant or baby. The baby cries and whines before vomiting in the arms of his nurse.

Shakespeare’s Seven Ages of Man

In the second stage of life man plays the role of a small boy or child. He holds a school bag, has a shiny face and walks as slowly as he can because he does not like school and is reluctant to leave home.

The role of the lover is the third stage of life. In the fourth stage of life the man plays the role of the soldier.

He has a beard, swears oaths and is ambitious to seek out honour. He is so keen to improve his reputation he is willing to risk dangers such as cannons in war.

Seven Ages Of Man by William Shakespeare

In the fifth stage of life man plays the role of a justice or judge. He has grown fat from eating expensive meats. He uses his experience of life and the knowledge he has gained to offer what he thinks are wise sayings and advice and good decisions.

  • He holds a school bag, has a shiny face and walks as slowly as he can because he does not like school and is reluctant to leave home;
  • The sixth actor is shown aging, in his home clothes, losing the sharpness of mind and strength of body;
  • He has a beard, swears oaths and is ambitious to seek out honour;
  • Our experienced writers have been analyzing poetry since they were college students, and they enjoy doing it;
  • Last scene of all, That ends this strange eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

In the sixth stage of life the man becomes a pantaloon or weak old man. He is so thin his stockings become loose. The speech compares this stage of life to a return to being like a baby or child. Old men and small children both have high voices and are dependent on adults. The seventh and final stage is extreme old age or a second childhood. Like babies very old men are dependent on others and have no teeth.

The old man loses his memory, hearing and control of his senses before dying.