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Compare the bell jar and cuckoo s nest

Kesey and Plath explore these personal struggles through the experiences of alienation and identity paranoia through evocative literary techniques; being overwhelmed and powerless to break free of their inner world of isolation.

Compare the bell jar and cuckoo s nest

Esther, in The Bell Jar, is a young, sensitive and intelligent woman who feels oppressed by the apparent social restrictions placed upon women in a pre-feminist, repressive 1950s America, and the pressure she feels regarding her future. She struggles with individuality and is faced with many choices complying with her future, and consequently, the path for the rest of her life.

Need essay sample on How do the writers Sylvia Plath. It was my own silence.

The short, simple, fragmented sentences also show us that Esther has an ability to reflect properly, and it also serves to highlight her own isolation. Bromden states that the other patients in the ward think he is mute and deaf, but in reality, he chooses not to speak, primarily due to being ignored and later combined with fear for Nurse Ratched. Although Bromden is the narrator, his descriptions cannot be fully trusted. There is no uncertainty as to whether there is truth in his vision; Kesey assures the reader that it is simply his imagination by having Bromden woken up by the night watchman.

The exact diagnosis of his disorder is never revealed, but is possibly schizophrenia or paranoia or as he is said to have served in the army, he may be suffering from shell shock. I feel that the reason Kesey withholds the true disorder Bromden suffers from, is to successfully sustain our interest throughout the novel. However, here he asks that the reader to keep an open mind towards his hallucinations, because even though they may not have actually happened, they provide a metaphorical view of the hidden events in the hospital, as he witnesses them, despite being in a hallucinatory state.

  • By referring to himself in third person when he sees himself in the mirror, suggests to us that he is not comfortable in his body and feels abnormal, and insinuates to the reader that his self-esteem and individuality is lost when he implies that his body is not his, but perhaps part of a machine;
  • In one flew over the cuckoo's nest the bell jar page 147 the jena six more prezis by author popular presentations see more popular or the latest prezis;
  • A comparison of the ways sylvia plath and ken kesey explore societies' notions of sanity and insanity in the bell jar and one flew over the cuckoo's nest discussing;
  • By stating that she resembles Betsy, it appears to the reader that she is trying to fit in but also enables us to further observe a sense of self-destruction due to her identity confusion;
  • Due to her confusion Esther adopts various parts of the personalities of the women in her life, which evidently neither fit nor reflect her true self.

I was open to the circulating air. It is obvious that she is being limited in some way or another, destroyed due to her inability to express herself. This gives us the idea that Esther is slowly driving herself crazy as she cannot break free of the forces around her, and in Plath presenting this idea; she is deriving and understanding from the reader.

She is gradually driven insane by the gender stereotypical restrictions of her social world and these burdens cause not only her social and intellectual deterioration, but also her mental destruction. It once again refers to the image of being trapped in a bell jar away from the world and feeling, and it is this recurrence of the bell jar that gives the novel unity of structure.

By referring to himself in third person when he sees himself in the mirror, suggests to us that he is not comfortable in his body and feels abnormal, and insinuates to the reader that his self-esteem and individuality is lost when he implies that his body is not his, but perhaps part of a machine. Along with his silence at the beginning of the novel, Kesey is showing Bromden to represent the more passive elements of society that submit to authority, such as the government and Nurse Ratched, thus reaching out to the reader and appealing to their sympathetic nature, as most people have, at some point in their lives felt dominated by, or struggled against seemingly authoritative figures.

Buddy does not appreciate the creative process that is highly valued by Esther who wants to be a poet. The majority of the readers of Bell Jar will have felt pressured by peers, or their family at some point in their lives, and this universal theme combined with precise and elaborate language helps relate us to the character of Esther on a strong personal level.

Esther does not have the courage to speak her mind and relieve her troubled thoughts until she is finally hospitalised. However Bromden finds a release from the struggles within himself with the arrival of McMurphy.

McMurphy was strong enough to oppose the repression, but in the end, he still loses. As the reader I felt satisfied by the distinctly promising ending, and after sharing and experiencing the struggles of Bromden through the text, believe that Kesey ended the novel on a positive note to enable the reader to gain closure on his shocking story, unlike the uncertain ending to Bell Jar.

Plath also has her central character imitate the ideas of others to push aside her hidden struggles. Throughout the novel she is unsure about her future and about her self, and it may seem that Esther herself is unable to define her identity. Due to her confusion Esther adopts various parts of the personalities of the women in her life, which evidently neither fit nor reflect her true self.

The simple fragmented sentence almost seems to the reader that she has confidence in the assertion of her character traits.

However, this is contradicted with the desire to be like Jay Cee, as her balance of marriage and career impresses her. By stating that she resembles Betsy, it appears to the reader that she is trying to fit in but also enables us to further observe a sense of self-destruction due to her identity confusion.

Her suicidal desires have been abandoned, for the time being, and she begins to connect with other people and the outside world. The novel lapses into a linear, traditional narrative towards the end, representing sanity as a complete and significant concept, however, whilst she is relieved to be free from her madness, she does not wholly believe that this is a permanent solution from her struggles.