Essays academic service


The fast changing world and the principles of the digital era

Change in the Digital Era: Both Too Fast and Too Slow

We need to bridge or at least narrow the digital divide and enable humans and human systems to evolve more in concert with technology. Change in the Digital Era is happening both way too fast and entirely too slowly. Never before have we been able to do so much so quickly and effortlessly, with the possibility of new technological capabilities seeming virtually limitless.

But technological change is outstripping our capacity to adapt. Technology Change in the Digital Era: New platforms, tools, channels, gadgets, and apps are being introduced almost daily or so it seemsalong with corresponding new concepts, terms, companies, revenue streams, and markets. Simultaneously, advances in mobile technology led to cell phones, then smartphones, then tablets. Now we also have the Internet of Things IoT as a megatrend, along with other uniquely Digital Era innovations like digital currency, drones, cybersecurity, robots, artificial intelligence — the list goes on!

I am committed to staying as current as possible with technology trends, and I have to admit there are days I feel completely overwhelmed by all the changes taking place. As exciting as all this technological progress is, I sometimes want to shout: It seems like we have created a monster of sorts, and the more we feed the monster, the more ravenous it gets. As users and consumers of digital technology, we are all culpable in creating this digital Frankenstein of course.

  1. Change in the Digital Era. And instead of primarily defining the success of technology companies — both start-ups and established firms — based on their splashy hits, we will place more value on incremental contributions and improvements that have a larger, albeit quieter, impacts.
  2. Is technology moving too fast published on monday in the aging population of the developed world change that is too rapid can be deeply divisive. Editorial reviews about the author eric chiang received his bachelor s degree in economics fast performance fire hd 10 highlight, take notes, and search in the book create digital flashcards instantly kindle e- with this edition, eric chiang begins a new era for his acclaimed principles of economics textbook.
  3. Put another way, to help others think outside the box, champions must think inside the box. We will shift from a focus on external uses of social media — particularly in a BtoC business-to-consumer context — to recognize the greater need and opportunity to address internal and inter-organizational applications and implications of new technologies in organizations of all types and sizes.
  4. Technology Change in the Digital Era. We will realize that we all have the opportunity — and ability — to be as digitally proficient as we want to be.
  5. We need to bridge or at least narrow the digital divide and enable humans and human systems to evolve more in concert with technology.

We insist on staying connected, we want content everywhere, we jump on bandwagons, we make things go viral and create digital sensations. It almost pains me to admit that not much has changed since then. After reading a number of pieces that focus on predictions, prognostications, and anticipated trends in the technology space, particularly social media and 2.

Nearly three years ago, I decided to devote myself full time to expanding the use of social media and 2.

The fast changing world and the principles of the digital era

Media hype and impassioned advocacy mask the reality that the vast majority of working adults — particularly those in leadership positions at organizations of all types — are still sitting on the sidelines of the digital movement. There are many reasons for this, of course — some of them justified, some not so much. Specifically, I want to articulate my hopes for what might happen inwhich can in turn lay the foundation for what should happen in the years ahead.

My specific hopes below are predicated on a general hope — namely, that the global economy will stabilize enough to encourage people to focus on the future with a renewed sense of optimism and confidence. I also hope we will devote more energy to action than talk, working together to address the opportunities and challenges we face rather than bickering and playing the blame game.

The realization of these hopes is critical to all kinds of advances and successes innot just the enhanced adoption of new technologies. One of the paradoxes of technology adoption is that it is fundamentally a human endeavor.

Throughout the early days of the Digital Era, our technological capabilities have generally exceeded the willingness and ability of people to leverage them.

Change in the Digital Era: Both Too Fast and Too Slow

Jane Young summarizes the situation well in her comment on this Forbes piece: My hopes for are rooted in the psychological challenges we face and are built on our willingness — both individually and collectively — to address them in thought, word, and deed.

Sort of in order but not reallyI hope that: People — especially organizational leaders — will recognize that we are fully in the Digital Era and will begin to explore more fully what that means for them as individuals and for their organizations. More leaders will act like leaders — taking a broader view of their organization, industry, and the larger world in which both function; focusing on the future; engaging in strategic discussions; demonstrating a willingness to take risks.

More specifically, they will recognize the transformative power of digital technology across multiple disciplines and will use their newly-acquired understanding to develop appropriate strategic priorities and objectives, and to allocate necessary human and other resources to pursue those objectives.

The fast changing world and the principles of the digital era

We will move past unproductive, moot arguments and focus more on developing solutions for managing the new realities of our lives as effectively as possible. We will understand that leveraging new digital technologies is at once both a r evolutionary step forward and a return to more natural ways of communicating, collaborating, and learning.

We will realize that digital technology is most effectively viewed as a means to achieving our goals and objectives rather than an end unto itself. We will shift from a focus on external uses of social media — particularly in a BtoC business-to-consumer context — to recognize the greater need and opportunity to address internal and inter-organizational applications and implications of new technologies in organizations of all types and sizes.

We will begin to integrate these technologies into existing projects and operations in all functional areas. We will develop more thoughtful and strategic approaches to digital engagement that employ appropriate platforms and communication channels based on organizational characteristics, stakeholder demographics, and other factors. We will realize that we all have the opportunity — and ability — to be as digitally proficient as we want to be.

As we all become more digitally proficient, we will once again realize that substance e. More high-quality formal education and training the fast changing world and the principles of the digital era social media and other new digital technologies will be available. And recognizing the need to make a lifelong investment in their own success, more people will take advantage of it to climb their short-term learning curves more efficiently and effectively — and to lay a strong foundation for continuous learning and improvement.

Organizations of all types will shift from public social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn to private digital networks PDNs for internal communication and collaboration. The value of PDNs for inter-organizational communication and collaboration will also be realized and exploited more fully.

Technology advocates will focus less on disruptive applications and more on how new technology can extend and enhance existing competencies rather than destroying them. And instead of primarily defining the success of technology companies — both start-ups and established firms — based on their splashy hits, we will place more value on incremental contributions and improvements that have a larger, albeit quieter, impacts. All things considered I view as a mixed bag. Put another way, to help others think outside the box, champions must think inside the box.

But for me above all else, we must educate. Change in the Digital Era: But there is no end in sight to the changes taking place. After six years of immersion in and commitment to addressing the opportunities and challenges created by social and digital technologies, I can attest that bringing about the necessary human changes will be neither easy nor fast. Above all else, we must educate.