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The life and contributions of mohandas karamchand gandhi

Born into a privileged caste, Gandhi was fortunate to receive a comprehensive education, but proved a mediocre student. In May 1883, aged 13, Gandhi was married to Kasturba Makhanji, a girl also aged 13, through the arrangement of their respective parents, as is customary in India.

  1. Violence spread through the country.
  2. Godse was the person responsible for the eventual assassination of Gandhi in January 1948, 14 years later.
  3. He matriculated from Samladas College in Bhavnager, Gujarat and went to England in 1888 to study law. He was not injured in the accident.

Following his entry into Samaldas College, at the University of Bombay, she bore him the first of four sons, in 1888. Determined to adhere to Hindu principles, which included vegetarianism as well as alcohol and sexual abstinence, he found London restrictive initially, but once he had found kindred spirits he flourished, and pursued the philosophical study of religions, including Hinduism, Christianity, Buddhism and others, having professed no particular interest in religion up until then.

On one occasion he was thrown from a first class train carriage, despite being in possession of a valid ticket. Witnessing the racial bias experienced by his countrymen served as a catalyst for his later activism, and he attempted to fight segregation at all levels.

He founded a political movement, known as the Natal Indian Congress, and developed his theoretical belief in non-violent civil protest into a tangible political stance, when he opposed the introduction of registration for all Indians, within South Africa, via non-cooperation with the relevant civic authorities.

On his return to India in 1916, Gandhi developed his practice of non-violent civic disobedience the life and contributions of mohandas karamchand gandhi further, raising awareness of oppressive practices in Bihar, in 1918, which saw the local populace oppressed by their largely British masters. He also encouraged oppressed villagers to improve their own circumstances, leading peaceful strikes and protests. As his fame spread, so his political influence increased: He also instigated a boycott of British goods and institutions, and his encouragement of mass civil disobedience led to his arrest, on 10th March 1922, and trial on sedition charges, for which he served 2 years, of a 6-year prison sentence.

When the British introduced a tax on salt in 1930, he famously led a 250-mile march to the sea to collect his own salt. Gandhi suffered six known assassination attempts during the course of his life. The first attempt came on 25th June 1934, when he was in Pune delivering a speech, together with his wife, Kasturba. Travelling in a motorcade of two cars, they were in the second car, which was delayed by the appearance of a train at a railway level crossing, causing the two vehicles to separate.

When the first vehicle arrived at the speech venue, a bomb was thrown at the car, which exploded and injured several people. Godse was the person responsible for the eventual assassination of Gandhi in January 1948, 14 years later. As a result, he was arrested on 9th August 1942, and held for two years at the Aga Khan Palace in Pune.

  • His birthday is a national holiday in India;
  • He was the 1930 Time Magazine Man of the Year;
  • He began a fast in support of the payment , which Hindu radicals, Nathuram Godse among them, viewed as traitorous;
  • He used this term for the first time during his struggles in South Africa.

In February 1944, 3 months before his release, his wife Kasturbai died in the same prison. May 1944, the time of his release from prison, saw the second attempt made on his life, this time certainly led by Nathuram Godse, although the attempt was fairly half-hearted. When word reached Godse that Gandhi was staying in a hill station near Pune, recovering from his prison ordeal, he organised a group of like-minded individuals who descended on the area, and mounted a vocal anti-Gandhi protest.

When invited to speak to Gandhi, Godse declined, but he attended a prayer meeting later that day, where he rushed towards Gandhi, brandishing a dagger and shouting anti-Gandhi slogans. He was overpowered swiftly by fellow worshippers, and came nowhere near achieving his goal.

Mohandas Gandhi Biography

Godse was not prosecuted at the time. Four months later, in September 1944, Godse led a group of Hindu activist demonstrators who accosted Gandhi at a train station, on his return from political talks.

Mahatma Gandhi Biography

Godse was again found to be in possession of a dagger that, although not drawn, was assumed to be the means by which he would again seek to assassinate Gandhi. Nevertheless, the Congress Party ignored his concerns, and accepted the partition proposals put forward by the British. Since the train was the only one scheduled at that time, it seems likely that the intended target of derailment was Gandhi himself.

He was not injured in the accident. At a prayer meeting after the event Gandhi is quoted as saying: I will not die just yet; I aim to live till the age of 125.

  1. Thousands of Indians joined him in his march. For More Information Barraclough, John.
  2. Two of his final legal achievements in Africa were a law declaring Indian rather than only Christian marriages valid, and the end of a tax on former indentured bound to work and unable to leave for a specific period of time Indian labor. As a result, when he was 19 years old Mohandas traveled to England where he studied law at the University College London.
  3. The situation there calmed, but rioting continued elsewhere.
  4. Godse was the person responsible for the eventual assassination of Gandhi in January 1948, 14 years later.

Placed under increasing pressure, by his political contemporaries, to accept Partition as the only way to avoid civil war in India, Gandhi reluctantly concurred with its political necessity, and India celebrated its Independence Day on 15th August 1947. Keenly recognising the need for political unity, Gandhi spent the next few months working tirelessly for Hindu-Muslim peace, fearing the build-up of animosity between the two fledgling states, showing remarkable prescience, given the turbulence of their relationship over the following half-century.

Unfortunately, his efforts to unite the opposing forces proved his undoing. He championed the paying of restitution to Pakistan for lost territories, as outlined in the Partition agreement, which parties in India, fearing that Pakistan would use the payment as a means to build a war arsenal, had opposed.

He began a fast in support of the paymentwhich Hindu radicals, Nathuram Godse among them, viewed as traitorous. When the political effect of his fast secured the payment to Pakistan, it secured with it the fifth attempt on his life. On 20th January a gang of seven Hindu radicals, which included Nathuram Godse, gained access to Birla House, in Delhi, a venue at which Gandhi was due to give an address. The plan was to explode the bomb during the speech, causing pandemonium, which would give two other gang members, Digambar Bagde and Shankar Kishtaiyya, an opportunity to shoot Gandhi, and escape in the ensuing chaos.

The bomb exploded prematurely, before the conference was underway, and Madanla Pahwa was captured, while the others, including Godse, managed to escape.