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Tips for writing a good personal statement

Tips for Writing a Personal Statement Reflection Reflect on your academic and extracurricular experiences and how they have shaped your motivations for a career in health care. Create a list of experiences that represent the evolution of your path to a career in health care. Identify key people mentors, faculty, supervisors. Think about the message you wish to convey.

Structure How do you want to tell your story? What are the key elements of your story that bring it into focus?

  1. If you do find yourself short on time and must tailor one basic essay to fit a number of different questions from a number of different schools, target your essay to your first-choice school, and keep in mind that the less your essay is suited to an application's particular questions, the more you may be jeopardizing your chances of being admitted to that school. What research have you conducted?
  2. Is my tone confident? What research have you conducted?
  3. This will give the reader a better idea of your individualism and make experiences that are common seem unique.

If you start with a thesis statement, remember to return to that thesis at the end t provide closure. The conclusion is a restatement of your focus, but in a way that shows how your story has evolved over time from mere observations to reflection to wisdom that will continue to serve you in your medcial training and as a clinician.

In answering the prompt "why do you want to become a clinician? Incorporate examples from your experiences that capture your commitment to serving in health care.

Tips for Writing a Personal Statement

For example, discuss an experience: Incorporate examples of leadership and overcoming hardship, to demonstrate perseverance, resilience and grit. Be succinct in illustrating your examples.

  1. In some cases, a student needs to explain a weak component of his or her application, but in other cases it may be best not to mention those weaknesses at all. Context Considerations How are personal statements read, and by whom?
  2. Ask someone else - preferably a faculty member in your area - to read your essay and make suggestions for further revision.
  3. Repeat information directly from the application form itself unless you use it to illustrate a point or want to develop it further. If you do find yourself short on time and must tailor one basic essay to fit a number of different questions from a number of different schools, target your essay to your first-choice school, and keep in mind that the less your essay is suited to an application's particular questions, the more you may be jeopardizing your chances of being admitted to that school.
  4. What do you expect to get out of it? Do… Answer all the questions asked.
  5. If you are applying to more than one program, you may find that each application asks a different question or set of questions, and that you don't really feel like writing a bunch of different responses. If this person were reading your application essay, what would most impress him or her?

Create smooth yet strong transitions throughout your story. Note what the sky looks like, what color a child's dress is, how the food smells.

  • Ask yourself the following questions as you edit for content;
  • In answering the prompt "why do you want to become a clinician?
  • Be honest and confident in your statements;
  • Some applications ask more specific questions than others;
  • It's most likely that your personal statement will be read by professors who serve on an admissions committee in the department to which you are applying;
  • Personal Inventory Questions What makes you unique, or at least different from, any other applicant?

Make sure your reader is right there with you. Share your personal emotions and indicate how your surroundings affected you. This will give the reader a better idea of your individualism and make experiences that are common seem unique.

Be anecdotal and use examples to illustrate your observations. Write with the intention of communicating something original. Don't just put down what you think the reader wants to hear.